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9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199678433.003.0010

Chapter: 9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2013

Author: Ian Anthony

IanAnthonyAbstract and keywords to be supplied9. Conventional arms control and military confidence buildingOverviewIn 2012 openness and restraint to provide reassurance that military capabilities will not be used for political gain—which is a broad definition of confidence- and security-building measures (CSBMs)—made a valuable contribution to reducing tensions and preventing the escalation of incidents in several regions of the world. As well as playing their part to prevent specific incidents from escalating into something worse, CSBMs are being developed more broadly in several regions as a positive tool to enhance cooperative relations among states based on

9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

Chapter: 9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Author: Ian Anthony

OverviewArms control has been continuously adapted in response to changes in the security environment, including the need to regulate and restrain the behaviour of non-state actors and the emergence of new technologies. The scope of application of legal-restraint measures now reaches far beyond the items that would traditionally be defined as arms. Likewise, the various existent and emerging frameworks of restraint are not limited to treaties and conventions. New innovations include, for example, politically binding confidence-building measures (CBMs) that are intended to promote the responsible use of information and communications technologies, and a shared ethical code intended to guide

9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198712596.003.0010

Chapter: 9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Author: Ian Anthony, Lina Grip, Chris Holland

IanAnthonyLinaGripChrisHollandOxChapML2.27OUP TCI20140403.0Medicine-USSIPRI Yearbook Series9. Conventional arms control and military confidence buildingOverviewArms control has been continuously adapted in response to changes in the security environment, including the need to regulate and restrain the behaviour of non-state actors and the emergence of new technologies. The scope of application of legal-restraint measures now reaches far beyond the items that would traditionally be defined as arms. Likewise, the various existent and emerging frameworks of restraint are not limited to treaties and conventions. New innovations include, for example, politically binding

14. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198737810.003.0014

Chapter: 14. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2015

Author: Ian Anthony, Mark Bromley, Vincent Boulanin, Lina Grip

IanAnthonyMarkBromleyVincentBoulaninLinaGripOxChapML2.27OUP TCI20150902.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen14. Conventional arms control and military confidence buildingOverviewIn 2014 conventional arms control continued to be underutilized in security and peacebuilding. In general, states do not emphasize the role of arms control as an important part of their national security policy—at either a global or a regional level. Instead of taking a balanced approach, in which arms control plays a role alongside military defence, crisis management, conflict prevention and conflict resolution, states prefer to predominantly rely on the capabilities

Conventions »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198737810.002.0007.021.0002

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2015

Conventions. .Data not available or not applicable–Nil or a negligible figure( )Uncertain datab.Billion (thousand million)kgKilogramkmKilometre (1000 metres)m.Millionth.Thousandtr.Trillion (million million)$US dollars€Euros

Conventions »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.002.0008.021.0102

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Conventions. .Data not available or not applicable–Nil or a negligible figure( )Uncertain datab.Billion (thousand million)kgKilogramkmKilometre (1000 metres)m.Millionth.Thousandtr.Trillion (million million)$US dollars€Euros

Conventions »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198811800.002.0007.021.0002

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2017

Conventions. .Data not available or not applicable–Nil or a negligible figure( )Uncertain datab.Billion (thousand million)kgKilogramkmKilometre (1000 metres)m.Millionth.Thousandtr.Trillion (million million)$US dollars€Euros

Conventions »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.002.0007.021.0001

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

Conventions¨Data not available or not applicable–Nil or a negligible figure( )Uncertain datab.Billion (thousand million)kgKilogramkmKilometre (1000 metres)m.Millionth.Thousandtr.Trillion (million million)$US dollars€Euros

7. Coping with crises: forced displacement in fragile contexts »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198811800.003.0007

Chapter: 7. Coping with crises: forced displacement in fragile contexts

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2017

Author: Lina Grip

LinaGripOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20170607.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen7. Coping with crises: forced displacement in fragile contextsOverviewIn 2016 forced displacement continued to be a major challenge to human security, most notably in the Middle East and Africa, which together currently host over two-thirds of the world’s displaced populations. In recent years the number of forcefully displaced persons has increased significantly—to over 60 million—when compared, for example, to population growth or general migration. This rise has been caused by new displacement crises such as in Yemen and South Sudan, coupled with protracted crises

1. Corruption and the arms trade: sins of commission »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.003.0002

Chapter: 1. Corruption and the arms trade: sins of commission

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Andrew Feinstein, Paul Holden, Barnaby Pace

AndrewFeinsteinPaulHoldenBarnabyPaceStudies undertaken to date suggest that the arms trade contributes substantially to global incidents of corruption. This prejudices purchasing and seller countries in financial and political terms, inasmuch as corruption corrodes democratic practice. A number of factors explain this infection, ranging from the secrecy imparted from involvement with national security protocols to opaque international networks that defy localized investigation. Key transactions, such as in South Africa, illustrate these concerns. While solutions are hard to find, a multinational arms trade treaty that includes corruption and bribery clauses would constitute a major step forward.1.