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10. Dual-use and arms trade controls »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199678433.003.0011

Chapter: 10. Dual-use and arms trade controls

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2013

Author: Sibylle Bauer, Paul Holtom

SibylleBauer andPaulHoltomAbstract and keywords to be supplied10. Dual-use and arms trade controlsOverviewGovernments are increasingly aware that controlling flows of conventional arms and items that can be used for both civilian and military purposes—dual-use items—is a complex process involving regulation of exports and associated brokering, transit, trans-shipment and financing activities. This complexity requires effort and cooperation from countries around the world. States, therefore, engage in various multilateral mechanisms and continually create new instruments, or adapt existing ones, to address these challenges.There were mixed results for multilateral efforts to strengthen trade controls

10. Dual-use and arms trade controls »

Type: chapter

Chapter: 10. Dual-use and arms trade controls

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Author: Sibylle Bauer

OverviewIn 2013 considerable progress was made in global efforts to strengthen trade controls for conventional arms, with the United Nations General Assembly agreeing in April on the text of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) after six years of negotiation. Multilateral efforts in the area of dual-use trade controls were not marked by similar landmark developments, but followed the incremental development path of recent years.The agreement on the ATT was the result of global efforts to reach a consensus on an international treaty to establish the ‘highest possible common international standards for the transfer of conventional arms’. Although the

10. Dual-use and arms trade controls »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198712596.003.0011

Chapter: 10. Dual-use and arms trade controls

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Author: Sibylle Bauer, Paul Holtom, Pieter D. Wezeman, Noel Kelly, Ivana Mićić

SibylleBauerPaulHoltomPieter D.WezemanNoelKellyIvanaMićićOxChapML2.27OUP TCI20140403.0Medicine-USSIPRI Yearbook Series10. Dual-use and arms trade controlsOverviewIn 2013 considerable progress was made in global efforts to strengthen trade controls for conventional arms, with the United Nations General Assembly agreeing in April on the text of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) after six years of negotiation. Multilateral efforts in the area of dual-use trade controls were not marked by similar landmark developments, but followed the incremental development path of recent years.The agreement on the ATT was the result

15. Dual-use and arms trade controls »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198737810.003.0015

Chapter: 15. Dual-use and arms trade controls

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2015

Author: Sibylle Bauer, Mark Bromley, Pieter D. Wezeman, Noel Kelly

SibylleBauerMarkBromleyPieter D.WezemanNoelKellyOxChapML2.27OUP TCI20150902.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen15. Dual-use and arms trade controlsOverviewThis chapter reviews international, multilateral and regional efforts to strengthen controls on the trade in conventional arms and dual-use items—items that can be used for both civilian and military purposes. A landmark event in the control of the trade in conventional arms took place in December 2014 when the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) entered into force. Multilateral efforts in the area of dual-use trade controls were not marked by similar milestones, but

19. Dual-use and arms trade controls »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.003.0019

Chapter: 19. Dual-use and arms trade controls

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Author: Sibylle Bauer, Mark Bromley

SibylleBauerMarkBromleyOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20160601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen19. Dual-use and arms trade controlsOverviewThis chapter reviews international, multilateral and regional efforts to strengthen controls on the trade in conventional arms and dual-use items—items that can be used for both civilian and military purposes.SectionIreviews aspects of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), focusing on the results of the First Conference of States Parties (CSP1), which took place in Cancun, Mexico on 24–27 August 2015. Despite disagreement on key issues during the preparatory process, key procedural decisions were made that

15. Dual-use and arms trade controls »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198811800.003.0015

Chapter: 15. Dual-use and arms trade controls

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2017

Author: Sibylle Bauer

SibylleBauerOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20170607.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen15. Dual-use and arms trade controlsOverviewThis chapter reviews global, multilateral and regional efforts to strengthen controls on the trade in conventional arms and dual-use items—goods, software and technologies that can be used both for civilian purposes and in connection with conventional, biological, chemical and nuclear weapons, and their delivery systems. It also outlines ongoing discussions to broaden the scope of current control measures and concepts.SectionIreviews aspects of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), focusing on the results of an Extraordinary Meeting

10. Dual-use and arms trade controls »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.003.0010

Chapter: 10. Dual-use and arms trade controls

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

Author: Dan Smith

OxChapML2.50OUP TCI20180606.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen10. Dual-use and arms trade controlsOverviewGlobal, multilateral and regional efforts continued in 2017 to strengthen controls on the trade in conventional arms and in dual-use items connected with conventional, biological, chemical and nuclear weapons and their delivery systems. Membership of the different international and multilateral instruments that are aimed at establishing and promoting agreed standards for dual-use and arms trade controls continued to expand. At the same time, ensuring effective implementation of these instruments—and reaching agreement about what ‘effective implementation’ means—continued to be a challenge. This

Errata »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.002.0010.021.1001

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International SecurityPage 615For ‘The 2014 Arms Trade Treaty (ATT)’read ‘The 2013 Arms Trade Treaty (ATT)’SIPRI Yearbook 2017: Armaments, Disarmament and International SecurityPage 74For ‘Section III provides an overview of military expenditures in and arms transfers to the countries of the Middle East’read ‘countries of the MENA region’Page 74For ‘Regional military spending increased by 50.5 per cent over the period 2006–15’read ‘increased by 54 per cent’Page 74For ‘Saudi Arabia is by far the largest military spender

4. Euro-Atlantic security and institutions: rebalancing in the midst of global change »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0005

Chapter: 4. Euro-Atlantic security and institutions: rebalancing in the midst of global change

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Alyson J.K. Bailes, Andrew Cottey

Alyson J.K.BailesAndrewCotteyThe main Euro-Atlantic institutions the EU, NATO and the OSCE are challenged by recent security setbacks, still-evolving threat patterns and shifts in global power relations. Burdened by the Afghanistan operation, NATO needs to revisit the more general balance between its tasks abroad and safety at home. The EU has belatedly strengthened its security governance with the Lisbon Treaty but remains a weak military actor and divided in other critical dimensions. Interest in pan-European cooperation appears higher than for some years. Europe–US relations are smoother under President Barack Obama but may grow more distant as other

6. European security »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198737810.003.0006

Chapter: 6. European security

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2015

Author: Ian Anthony

IanAnthonyOxChapML2.27OUP TCI20150902.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen6. European securityOverviewIn 2014 the escalating political crisis in Ukraine was followed by a rapid descent into a major conflict that drew in a wide range of external actors—in roles such as combatant, armourer and mediator. The political relationship between Russia and a spectrum of Western countries deteriorated rapidly, and some institutional relationships may have been damaged irrevocably—such as between the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and Russia, and between the European Union and Russia.The speed with which a relatively new and previously