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Annexes »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198737810.021.0084

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2015

Annex A.Arms control and disarmament agreementsAnnex B.International security cooperation bodiesAnnex C.Chronology 2014

Annexes »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.021.0084

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Annex A.Arms control and disarmament agreementsAnnex B.International security cooperation bodiesAnnex C.Chronology 2015

Annexes »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198811800.021.0090

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2017

Author: Dan Smith

Annex A.Arms control and disarmament agreementsAnnex B.International security cooperation bodiesAnnex C.Chronology 2016

Annexes »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.021.0091

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

Author: Dan Smith

Annex A.Arms control and disarmament agreementsAnnex B.International security cooperation bodiesAnnex C.Chronology 2017

Appendix 11A. Multilateral arms embargoes, 2010 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0012

Chapter: 11. Strategic trade controls: countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Pieter D. Wezeman, Noel Kelly

Pieter D.WezemanNoelKellyAppendix 11A. Multilateral arms embargoes, 2010I. IntroductionThere were 29 mandatory multilateral arms embargoes in force in 2010, directed at a total of 16 targets, including governments, non-governmental forces and a transnational network. The United Nations imposed 12 of these embargoes, the European Union (EU) imposed 16 and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) imposed 1.1The UN Security Council imposed no new arms embargoes during 2010, but it did widen its arms embargo on Iran. One UN arms embargo, on Sierra Leone, was lifted.Of the EU’s 16

Appendix 12A. Multilateral arms embargoes, 2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0013

Chapter: 12. Controls on security-related international transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Pieter D. Wezeman, Noel Kelly

Pieter D.WezemanNoelKellyAppendix 12A. Multilateral arms embargoes, 2009I. IntroductionThere were 29 mandatory multilateral arms embargoes in force in 2009, directed at a total of 17 targets, including governments, non-governmental forces and a transnational network. The United Nations imposed 12 of these embargoes, the European Union (EU) imposed 16 and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) imposed 1.1During 2009 the UN Security Council imposed its first new arms embargo since 2006, on Eritrea. The UN widened the arms embargo on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, or North Korea)

Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2000–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0001

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Lotta Harbom, Peter Wallensteen

LottaHarbomPeterWallensteen*Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2000–2009I. Global patterns in major armed conflictsIn 2009, 17 major armed conflicts were active in 16 locations around the world (seetables2A.1 and2A.2). During the past decade, 30 major armed conflicts have been active in 29 locations worldwide.1 There has been a slight overall reduction in the number of major armed conflicts over the past decade, but the trend has been uneven (seefigure2A.1). Starting at 19 in 2000, the number declined steadily until 2004, when

Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2001–10 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0001

Chapter: 2. Resources and armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Lotta Themnér, Peter Wallensteen

LottaThemnérPeterWallensteen*Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2001–10I. Global patternsIn 2010, 15 major armed conflicts were active in 15 locations worldwide (seetables 2A.1 and2A.2). During the 10-year period 2001–10, 29 major armed conflicts were active in 28 locations (seefigure 2A.1).1 The annual number of active major armed conflicts fell over the period, from 19 in 2001. However, the decline was uneven and the lowest number, 14, is recorded for 2004 and 2007 (seefigure 2A.2).2For the seventh consecutive year, no

Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2010 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0002

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Tim Macintyre, Camilla Schippa

TimMacintyreCamillaSchippa*Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2010I. IntroductionThe concept of peace is notoriously difficult to define. The simplest way of approaching it is in terms of harmony achieved by the absence of war or conflict. Applied to states, this would suggest that those not involved in wars with neighbouring states or suffering internal violent conflicts have achieved a state of peace. This is what Johan Galtung defined as ‘negative peace’ —an absence of violence.1 The concept of negative peace is immediately intuitive and empirically measurable and can be used

Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2011 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0002

Chapter: 2. Resources and armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Camilla Schippa, Daniel Hyslop

CamillaSchippaDanielHyslop*Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2011I. IntroductionNow in its fifth year, the Global Peace Index (GPI), produced by the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP), is a measurement of the peacefulness of countries based on a scoring model that uses 23 indicators to rank 153 countries by their relative states of peace. The indicators have been selected as being the best available data sets that reflect the incidence or absence of peace. They contain both quantitative data and qualitative scores from a range of trusted sources.The GPI’s principal aim