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Appendix 6B. Major arms industry acquisitions, 2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0007

Chapter: 6. Arms production

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Susan T. Jackson

Susan T.JacksonAppendix 6B. Major arms industry acquisitions, 2009Table6B.1 lists major acquisitions in the arms industries of member states of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that were announced or completed between 1 January and 31 December 2009. It is not an exhaustive list of all acquisition activity but gives a general overview of strategically significant and financially noteworthy transactions.Table 6B.1. Major acquisitions in the OECD arms industries, 2009Figures are in US $m., at current prices.Buyer company (country)/Subsidiary (country)aAcquired company (country)Seller company (country)bDeal value

Appendix 6B. The financial value of states’ arms exports, 2000–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0009

Chapter: 6. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Mark Bromley

MarkBromleyAppendix 6B. The financial value of states’ arms exports, 2000–2009Table 6B.1 presents official data on the financial value of states’ arms exports in 2000–2009. The countries included in the table are those that provide official data on the financial value of ‘arms exports’, ‘licences for arms exports’ or ‘arms export agreements’ for at least 6 of the 10 years covered and for which the average of the values given exceeds $10 million. In all cases, the ‘stated data coverage’ reflects the language used in the official publication from which the data has been extracted. National

Appendix 6C. Transparency in arms transfers »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0010

Chapter: 6. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Mark Bromley, Paul Holtom

MarkBromleyPaulHoltom*Appendix 6C. Transparency in arms transfersI. IntroductionOfficial and publicly accessible data on arms transfers is important for assessing states’ arms export and arms procurement policies. However, publishing data on arms sales and acquisitions is a sensitive issue for nearly all states. This appendix analyses recent developments in official international, regional and national reporting mechanisms that aim, in whole or in part, to increase the quality and quantity of publicly available information on international arms transfers.Section II describes the trend in reporting to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms

Appendix 7A. Global stocks and production of fissile materials, 2010 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0011

Chapter: 7. World nuclear forces

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Alexander Glaser, Zia Mian

AlexanderGlaserZiaMian*Appendix 7A. Global stocks and production of fissile materials, 2010Materials that can sustain an explosive fission chain reaction are essential for all types of nuclear explosives, from first-generation fission weapons to advanced thermonuclear weapons. The most common of these fissile materials are highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium of almost any isotopic composition. This appendix gives details of current stocks of HEU (table 7A.1) and separated plutonium (table 7A.2), including in weapons, and details of the current capacity to produce these materials (tables 7A.3 and7A.4,

Appendix 7A. The suppliers and recipients of major conventional weapons, 2005–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0008

Chapter: 7. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

The SIPRI Arms Transfers ProgrammeAppendix 7A. The suppliers and recipients of major conventional weapons, 2005–2009I. IntroductionThe SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme maintains the SIPRI Arms Transfers Database, which contains information on deliveries of major conventional weapons to states, international organizations and non-state armed groups since 1950.1 SIPRI ascribes a trend-indicator value (TIV) to each weapon or subsystem included in the database. SIPRI then calculates the volume of transfers to, from and between all of the above-listed entities using the TIV and the number of weapon systems or subsystems delivered in a given year. TIV

Appendix 7B. The financial value of the arms trade, 1999–2008 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0009

Chapter: 7. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Mark Bromley

MarkBromleyAppendix 7B. The financial value of the arms trade, 1999–2008Table7B.1 presents official data on the financial value of the arms trade in 1999–2008. The countries included in the table are those that provide official data on the financial value of ‘arms exports’, ‘licences for arms exports’ or ‘arms export agreements’ for at least 6 of the 10 years covered and for which the average of the values given exceeds $10 million. In all cases, the ‘Stated data coverage’ follows the language used in the official publication from which the data has been extracted. National

Appendix 7C. Transparency in arms transfers »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0010

Chapter: 7. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Mark Bromley, Paul Holtom

MarkBromleyPaulHoltomAppendix 7C. Transparency in arms transfersI. IntroductionOfficial and publicly accessible data on arms transfers is important for assessing states’ arms export and arms procurement policies. However, publishing data on arms sales and acquisitions is a sensitive issue for nearly all states. This appendix analyses recent developments in official international, regional and national reporting mechanisms which aim, in whole or in part, to increase the quality and quantity of publicly available information on international arms transfers.Section II describes trends in reporting to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms (UNROCA), while section

Appendix 8A. Global stocks of fissile materials, 2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0011

Chapter: 8. World nuclear forces

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Alexander Glaser, Zia Mian

AlexanderGlaserZiaMian*Appendix 8A. Global stocks of fissile materials, 2009Tables8A.1 and8A.2 detail global stocks of highly enriched uranium and separated plutonium, respectively.Table 8A.1. Global stocks of highly enriched uranium (HEU), 2009National stockpile (tonnes)aProduction statusCommentsChina20 ± 4bStopped 1987–89Francec35 ± 6bStopped early 1996Includes 5.0 tonnes declared civilianIndiad0.6 ± 0.3bContinuingIsraele0.1Pakistan2.1 ± 0.4bContinuingRussiaf770 ± 300bStopped 1987 or 1988Includes 100 tonnes assumed

Appendix 8B. Nuclear explosions, 1945–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0012

Chapter: 8. World nuclear forces

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Vitaly Fedchenko

VitalyFedchenkoAppendix 8B. Nuclear explosions, 1945–2009I. IntroductionIn May 2009 the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, or North Korea) conducted what is widely believed to be a nuclear test explosion. This was North Korea’s second nuclear explosion, following one conducted in October 2006, and brought the total number of nuclear explosions recorded since 1945 to 2054. This appendix describes the available information on the North Korean explosion and then presents up-to-date data on the number of nuclear explosions conducted since 1945.1II. The nuclear test in North KoreaIII. Estimated number of nuclear explosions, 1945–2009

2. Armed conflict »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199650583.003.0003

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2012

Author: Marie Allansson, Jonas Baumann, Samuel Taub, Lotta Themnér, Peter Wallensteen Uppsala Conflict Data Program, Marcus Nilsson, Camilla Schippa, Thomas Morgan Institute for Economics and Peace

MarieAllanssonJonasBaumannSamuelTaubLottaThemnérPeterWallensteen Uppsala Conflict Data ProgramMarcusNilssonCamillaSchippaThomasMorgan Institute for Economics and Peace2. Armed conflictOverviewDuring 2011 the sudden and dramatic popular uprisings in parts of the Middle East and North Africa, which together constituted the Arab Spring, produced diverse patterns of conflict. From the street protests that led to the flight into exile of Tunisia’s president, to the serious armed confrontations that developed in Libya and Syria, the emergence of mass opposition to the region’s ruling regimes was the precursor to dynamic and complex