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8. Chemical and biological security threats »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.003.0008

Chapter: 8. Chemical and biological security threats

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

Author: Dan Smith

OxChapML2.50OUP TCI20180606.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen8. Chemical and biological security threatsOverviewThe United Nations, the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) and governments continued to evaluate allegations of chemical weapon (CW) use in Iraq and Syria in 2017. Both the UN Security Council and the OPCW Executive Council remained deadlocked on the question of Syrian Government responsibility for CW use (seesectionI), including with regard to the use of sarin at Khan Shaykhun on 4 April. This attack prompted the United States to launch retaliatory Tomahawk cruise missile

3. Civilian roles in peace operations »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0004

Chapter: 3. Civilian roles in peace operations

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Sharon Wiharta, Stephanie Blair

SharonWihartaStephanieBlairCivilians play an ever more central role in multidimensional and integrated peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. Although the civilian dimension has been strengthened by a range of recent institutional innovations, peace operations are plagued by the persistent challenges of deploying the appropriate people at the right time and in the appropriate numbers. The UN Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) illustrates the importance of addressing the civilian capacity gap, while taking into account the interrelation of such factors as financing peace operations and recruitment. It also highlights the need for a critical analysis of the purpose and objectives of

12. Climate and security »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.003.0012

Chapter: 12. Climate and security

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Author: Janani Vivekananda, Lukas Rüttinger

JananiVivekanandaLukasRüttingerOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20160601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen12. Climate and securityOverviewThe past decade has seen increased acknowledgement within the academic literature and among the policy community of the relationship between climate change and security. Growing evidence of the links between climate change impacts and human security were detailed in the most recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Its first ever chapter dedicated to the topic states that: ‘human security will be progressively threatened as the climate changes’.Climate change is best understood as a ‘threat

Contact information »

Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198712596.002.0008.021.0003

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Contact informationCustomers within the AmericasEmail:oxfordonline@oup.comTelephone: +1 (800) 624 0153Fax: +1 (919) 677 8877Customers outside the AmericasEmail:institutionalsales@oup.comTelephone: +44 (0) 1865 353705Fax: +44 (0) 1865 353308

12. Controls on security-related international transfers »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0013

Chapter: 12. Controls on security-related international transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Sibylle Bauer, Ivana Micic

SibylleBauerIvanaMicicNon-proliferation efforts have shifted focus from physical movement of goods to analysis of the elements of a transaction that should be subject to control. The main export control forums attempt to effectively control exports of items that may be used in nuclear, biological and chemical weapons and in their missile delivery systems. They also discuss intangible transfers of technology, enforcement, good practices and engagement with non-participating states. The EU has increased cooperation with non-EU countries through technical assistance programmes. In 2009 it adopted a strengthened regulation to control transit and brokering of dual-use items that may

10. Conventional arms control »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199650583.003.0011

Chapter: 10. Conventional arms control

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2012

Author: Lina Grip, Mark Bromley, Glenn Mcdonald, Pieter D. Wezeman, Noel Kelly, Hans-Joachim Schmidt, Wolfgang Zellner

LinaGripMarkBromleyGlennMcdonaldPieter D.WezemanNoelKellyHans-JoachimSchmidtWolfgangZellner10. Conventional arms controlOverviewWhile states are continuously concerned with whether or not their national military potential is properly matched to vulnerabilities (actual or perceived), they have also been willing to discuss restraints on military capabilities with one another. With the exception of some promising progress in South America and in South Eastern Europe, in 2011 most developments in conventional arms control were discouraging as states were not willing to modify national positions in order to facilitate agreement, either globally or regionally.Three

11. Conventional arms control »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0012

Chapter: 11. Conventional arms control

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Zdzislaw Lachowski

ZdzislawLachowskiEndeavours to rejuvenate European conventional arms control intensified in 2009. The European security dialogue continued stressing the need to revitalize arms control and military confidence and security building. The proposal by Russia for a European security treaty gave hope for progress. The 1990 Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe, however, has remained in abeyance since December 2007. Further steps were taken to make the Western Balkans subregional arms control framework more self-reliant. Efforts to control so-called inhumane weapons continued in 2009, although with less dynamism than demonstrated in 2008 by the ‘Oslo process’ on cluster munitions.11.

14. Conventional arms control »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198811800.003.0014

Chapter: 14. Conventional arms control

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2017

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20170607.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen14. Conventional arms controlOverviewThe Geneva Conventions are an international benchmark for behaviour during armed conflict. In 2011 the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) initiated a multi-year project to update a series of commentaries that provide guidance to states on how to interpret and implement the conventions. The first update is on the Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Wounded and Sick in Armed Forces in the Field, and is part of a series of commentaries that will consider changes

9. Conventional arms control »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.003.0009

Chapter: 9. Conventional arms control

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

Author: Dan Smith

OxChapML2.50OUP TCI20180606.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen9. Conventional arms controlOverviewThe regulation of different categories of weapons as a means of trying to improve compliance with international humanitarian law has become an important theme in conventional arms control. However, participation in humanitarian arms control agreements is far from universal and states parties to such agreements still face many implementation challenges. According to some states and civil society groups, there are also gaps in humanitarian arms control and disarmament law that need to be addressed. In 2017, negotiations to address some of these challenges

10. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.003.0011

Chapter: 10. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Zdzislaw Lachowski

ZdzislawLachowski*In 2010 improved relations between Russia and the United States, the signing of the New START treaty and efforts to surmount obstacles on the European security agenda ‘reset’ conventional arms control and confidence- and security-building measures (CSBMs). Proposals made in 2010 on the two tracks of European arms control dialogue, the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe regime and the Vienna Document on CSBMs, will inform future work. Arms control in Europe depends on the strategic interests of its main actors. Elsewhere, the relevance of the Treaty on Open Skies was reaffirmed at its second review