We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2015

SIPRI Yearbook 2015

IV. Chemical disarmament in conflict areas

Chapter:
13. Chemical and biological security threats
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2015
Author(s):
John Hart, Peter Clevestig

In 2014, states and international bodies such as the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) worked to coordinate efforts under the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) to monitor and verifiably destroy chemical weapons and associated infrastructure in the major conflict areas of Iraq, Libya and Syria.1 These efforts faced various challenges, which provide context for the policy considerations and operational issues associated with arms control in cases where state and non-state actors from within and outside a region are interacting in contested or ungoverned spaces. An analysis of some of the key monitoring and verification actions, with a particular focus on the largely consensus-based approach adopted by the OPCW in Syria during 2014, provides an indication of what can be achieved in such cases.

Citation (MLA):
Hart, John, and Peter Clevestig. "13. Chemical and biological security threats." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 18 Feb. 2019. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-chapter-13-div1-5.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Hart, J., & Clevestig, P. (2016). 13. Chemical and biological security threats. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 18 Feb. 2019, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-chapter-13-div1-5.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Hart, John, and Peter Clevestig. "13. Chemical and biological security threats." In SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 18 Feb. 2019, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-chapter-13-div1-5.xml
The SIPRI Yearbook online requires a subscription or purchase to access its full text (purchase of a print copy of the 2010-2016 yearbooks also provides access to some content). Unsubscribed users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.
Please log in to access full text content, or find out more about how to subscribe.
If you think you should have access to this service, please contact your librarian.