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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2015

SIPRI Yearbook 2015

About the authors

Chapter:
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2015

  • Dr Ian Anthony (United Kingdom) is Director ad interim of SIPRI, as well as Director of the SIPRI European Security Programme. He was previously Director of the SIPRI Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His publications include Reforming Nuclear Export Controls: The Future of the Nuclear Suppliers Group, SIPRI Research Report no. 22 (2007, co-author) and The Future of Nuclear Weapons in NATO (Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, 2010, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1988.

  • Gabrielle Bardall (United States) has worked as an elections specialist in over 30 countries for international organizations including the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UN Women, the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), the International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES), Democracy Reporting International (DRI), the Carter Center and others. She focuses on women’s political participation and electoral violence in transitional states. She is a doctoral candidate at the Université de Montréal. She is also a 2012 Trudeau Scholar, an Expert BRIDGE (Building Resources in Democracy, Governance and Elections) facilitator and alumna of the Women’s Campaign School at Yale University.

  • Dr Sibylle Bauer (Germany) is Co-Director of the SIPRI Dual-use and Arms Trade Control Programme. Before joining SIPRI in 2003, she was a researcher with the Institute for European Studies (ULB) in Brussels. Since 2005 she has designed and implemented capacity-building activities in Europe and South East Asia, with a focus on legal and enforcement issues related to the enhancement of transit, brokering and export controls. Her publications include ‘Nuclear export control’, Routledge Handbook of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Policy (Routledge, 2015). She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2004.

  • Elin Bjarnegård (Sweden) is a political scientist and Assistant Professor at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University, where she is also a core group member of the East Asian Peace Programme. Her research interests are within the field of comparative politics, and peace and conflict studies, with a particular focus on gender, masculinities, conflict, political parties and informal institutions. Her publications have appeared in journals such as Representation and International Interactions. Her book Gender, Informal Institutions and Political Recruitment: Explaining Male Dominance in Parliamentary Representation was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2013, and a paperback edition is forthcoming in 2015.

  • Emma Bjertén-Günther (Sweden) assists with research for SIPRI’s Security and Development Programme and is currently working on the Gender, Security and Development Project. The project examines how the concept of gender is constructed during times of peace and conflict, and how insecurity and violence impacts men and women differently.

  • Dr Vincent Boulanin (France) is a Researcher with SIPRI’s European Security Programme. He works on issues related to the production, use and control of emerging military and security technologies, notably cyber-surveillance tools and autonomous weapon systems. He received his PhD in political science from École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris in October 2014. His dissertation looked at the diversification of the European defence industry into the realm of security. His recent publications include Cyber Threats and Nuclear Dangers, Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (CNND) Policy Brief no. 17, (Nov. 2014, co-author) and ‘Arms production goes cyber: a challenge for arms control’, SIPRI Essay (May 2013). He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

  • Oliver Bräuner (Germany) was a Researcher with SIPRI’s China and Global Security Project from 2010 to 2015. His research at SIPRI looked at regional security in East Asia, Chinese foreign and security policy, and the security relationship between China and the European Union. His recent publications include ‘Confrontation and cooperation in the East China Sea: Chinese perspectives’, SIPRI Policy Brief (Feb. 2015, co-author) and Western Arms Exports to China, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 43 (Jan. 2015, co-author).

  • Mark Bromley (United Kingdom) is Co-Director of the SIPRI Dual-use and Arms Trade Control Programme, where his work focuses on national, regional and international efforts to regulate the international arms trade. Previously, he was a policy analyst for the British American Security Information Council (BASIC). His recent publications include Western Arms Exports to China, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 43 (Jan. 2015, co-author); ‘The Arms Trade Treaty: challenges for the First Conference of States Parties’, SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security (Sep. 2014, co-author); and ‘Arms Trade Treaty assistance: identifying a role for the European Union’, EU Non-proliferation Consortium Discussion Paper (Feb. 2014, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2004.

  • Dr Johan Brosché (Sweden) is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. His areas of expertise include communal conflicts, conflict inter-linkages and causes of peace. His doctoral dissertation Masters of War: The Role of Elites in Sudan’s Communal Conflicts was published in 2014. Other publications include Violent Conflict and Peacebuilding: the Continuing Crisis in Darfur (Routledge, 2013, co-author) and Sharing Power: Enabling Peace? Evaluating Sudan’s Comprehensive Peace Agreement (United Nations and Uppsala University, 2009). He has been part of an academic taskforce on peace processes in Sudan, supporting Jan Eliasson in his work as United Nations Special Envoy for Darfur.

  • Karen Brounéus (Sweden) is a Senior Lecturer and Director of Studies at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. She is a clinical psychologist by training and her PhD focused on psychological aspects of post-conflict truth and reconciliation processes with a particular focus on the ‘gacaca’ process in Rwanda.

  • Alison Burt (United States) is a Programme Officer/Data Specialist at the Center on International Cooperation (CIC) at New York University and a Research Assistant at SIPRI. Currently, she is involved in organizing the data for the CIC’s Annual Review of Global Peace Operations and researching topics on data-gathering on violent extremism, global norm-setting in the post-2015 era, and monitoring for SDG (Sustainable Development Goal) 16.

  • Marcelo Carreira (Brazil) is a PhD student in comparative history at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He is a historian specialized in contemporary history and international security studies, and peace studies on comparative analysis. He is currently completing research on his doctoral thesis about the emergence of a new structural peace framework at the end of the 20th century and its effects on South American defence, especially Brazilian defence policies.

  • Nigel Chamberlain (United Kingdom) worked as a consultant researching and writing about international relations and security issues for NATO Watch from 2012 to 2014. Previously he worked as an analyst and press officer for the British American Security Information Council (BASIC) from 2002 to 2006; and for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament as a Press Officer in the London office from 1999 to 2002 and as a Regional Development Officer in Cumbria and North Lancashire from 1993 to 1999. He is a former teacher and has a research MA from the University of Alberta in Canada.

  • Dr Peter Clevestig (Sweden) is a Senior Researcher with the Chemical and Biological Security Project of the SIPRI Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. He specializes in the safety and security of biological materials, biotechnology and related policies. He has authored several articles and book chapters on bioterrorism, security aspects of the life sciences and the threats posed by infectious diseases, as well as the Handbook of Applied Biosecurity for Life Science Laboratories (SIPRI, 2009). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2008.

  • Dr Ian Davis (United Kingdom) is Director of the SIPRI Editorial, Publications and Library Department, which includes responsibility for producing the SIPRI Yearbook, as Executive Editor. Prior to joining SIPRI in November 2014 he held several senior positions and worked as an independent human security and arms-control consultant. He has a long record of research and publication on international and regional security issues, is a trustee of Maternal & Childhealth Advocacy International (MCAI) and blogs on NATO-related issues.

  • Dr Mathieu Duchâtel (France) is a Senior Researcher and has been Head of the China and Global Security Project at SIPRI since 2011. He is based in Beijing, where he works on China’s foreign and security policies, with a focus on the Korean peninsula and the East China Sea, China–Europe relations, and the protection of Chinese nationals abroad. As SIPRI’s representative in Beijing, he develops cooperation with Chinese research institutions and outreach activities. From 2006 to 2011, in his previous position as a Research Fellow at the Asia Centre in Paris, he was the chief editor of China Analysis, jointly published with the European Council of Foreign Relations. He holds a PhD in political science from the Institute of Political Studies in Paris.

  • Dr Neil T. N. Ferguson (Ireland) is an economist specializing in research at the nexus of economic development and fragility. He is currently affiliated with The Hague Institute for Global Justice in the Netherlands, working on a Dutch Scientific Research Organization-funded project to establish the relationship between employment interventions and political stability. He has previously worked at SIPRI and the German Institute of Economic Research (DIW Berlin) and obtained his PhD in economics on the Scottish Graduate Programme in Economics at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. His current research interests include: development economics, political economy, behavioural game theory, multi-dimensional indexing and impact evaluation. He has ongoing research projects in Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico and across sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Dr Aude Fleurant (Canada) is Director of the Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. Before joining SIPRI in 2014, she was Director of Arms and Defence Economics at the Paris-based Military Academy Strategic Research Institute. She has authored several articles on the arms industry and military expenditure during her tenures at the military academy and at SIPRI. This is her first SIPRI Yearbook contribution.

  • Ludvig Foghammar (Sweden) assisted with research for SIPRI’s Security and Development Programme in 2015. He is an MSc student in Global Health at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. He has previous experience of analytical work for the Transparency International Secretariat in Berlin and the Embassy of Sweden in Canberra. He holds degrees from Lund University in Business and Economics, and Politics and Economics.

  • Dr Erika Forsberg (Sweden) is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. Her current research focus is on issues pertaining to gender and armed conflict, including studying how local variation in gender inequality may be related to locations of political violence and how gender-specific war trauma may impact on post-conflict reconciliation. She has also conducted extensive research on spatial contagion of civil wars.

  • Dr Alexander Glaser (Germany) is an Assistant Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. He works on nuclear energy and security policy with a focus on nuclear non-proliferation and arms control. He is a participant in the university’s Programme on Science and Global Security, co-editor of the journal Science & Global Security, and co-chair of the International Panel on Fissile Materials, which publishes the annual Global Fissile Material Report. He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2007.

  • Lina Grip (Sweden) is a Researcher with the SIPRI European Security Programme. She was previously a Researcher with the SIPRI Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. She is SIPRI’s coordinator for the EU Non-proliferation Consortium and a doctoral candidate in political science. Her recent publications include ‘History never repeats? Imports, impact and control of small arms in Africa’, Contemporary Security Policy, vol. 36, no. 1 (2015). She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2012.

  • Dr John Hart (United States) is a Senior Researcher and Head of the Chemical and Biological Security Project of the SIPRI Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His recent publications include The Analysis of Competing Hypotheses (ACH) in the Assessment of Chemical Warfare Activities (Helsinki National Defence University, 2014). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1997.

  • Kristine Höglund (Sweden) is a Professor at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. Her areas of expertise include the dynamics of peace processes, particularly pertaining to violence, trust and mediation; the causes and consequences of electoral violence; and gender dimensions of transitional justice. Her work has been published in numerous journals, including the British Journal of Political Science, Democratization, Review of International Studies, Negotiation Journal, Peacebuilding, International Negotiation and International Peacekeeping. She is the author of Peace Negotiations in the Shadow of Violence (Martinus Nijhoff, 2008) and co-editor of Understanding Peace Research: Methods and Challenges (Routledge, 2011).

  • Daniel Hyslop (Australia) is a Research Manager at the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP). He is an applied researcher in development studies, in measuring trends in peace and conflict, violence and terrorism, and the economics of peace. He also manages IEP’s external research partnerships with a variety of intergovernmental and non-profit organizations. He has worked in various multidisciplinary research and policy roles in political, university and government environments. He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2011.

  • Dr Rachel Irwin (United States) is a Senior Researcher with SIPRI’s Security and Development Programme, where she works on issues related to gender and development, and humanitarian access. Her recent publications include ‘Violence against healthcare workers in complex security environments’, SIPRI Background Paper (Nov. 2014). She is also a postdoctoral researcher at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm where her research is on the history of the World Health Organization.

  • Suyoun Jang (Republic of Korea) is a Researcher with SIPRI’s Security and Development Programme. Her current research is on fragile states, security and development, and official development assistance in conflict-affected fragile states. Her publications include ‘From “fragility” to “complexity”: reframing development in difficult places’, SIPRI Essay (Nov. 2014); ‘South Korea’s contribution to the promotion of human security’ in The Protection and Promotion of Human Security in East Asia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013); and ‘Human security and development: divergent approaches to Myanmar/Burma’, Pacific Focus (2013, co-author).

  • Karin Johansson (Sweden) is a PhD candidate at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. Sexual violence during armed conflict is her main research focus.

  • Noel Kelly (Ireland) is a Programme Coordinator for the SIPRI Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. He is responsible for maintaining several project databases common to this programme. He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2009, reporting on arms embargoes, the annual SIPRI military expenditure questionnaire findings and the findings of the United Nations reporting system on military expenditure.

  • Shannon N. Kile (United States) is a Senior Researcher and Head of the Nuclear Weapons Project of the SIPRI Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His principal areas of research are nuclear arms control and non-proliferation, with a special interest in Iran and North Korea. His publications include Europe and Iran: Perspectives on Non-proliferation, SIPRI Research Report no. 21 (2005, editor) and Verifying a Fissile Materials Cut-off Treaty: Technical and Organizational Considerations, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 33 (2012). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1993.

  • Hans M. Kristensen (Denmark) is Director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists (FAS). He is a frequent consultant to the news media and institutes on nuclear weapon matters and is co-author of the ‘Nuclear notebook’ column in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. His recent publications include ‘Nuclear weapons modernizations: a threat to the NPT?’, Arms Control Today (May 2014) and Trimming Nuclear Excess: Options for Further Reductions of U.S. and Russian Nuclear Forces (FAS, 2012). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2001.

  • Dr Jaïr van der Lijn (Netherlands) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme, where he leads the research on peace operations and conflict management. He is also a Senior Research Associate at the Netherlands Institute of International Relations (Clingendael) and an Associate Fellow at the Radboud University in Nijmegen. His research interests include the future of peace operations, evaluation and factors for success and failure of peace operations, and comprehensive approaches in missions. His most recent publications include The Future Peace Operations Landscape: Voices from Stakeholders Around the Globe (SIPRI, Jan. 2015, co-author) and ‘Peacekeepers at risk: the lethality of peace operations’, SIPRI Policy Brief (Feb. 2014, co-author).

  • Aron Lund (Sweden) is a writer and journalist specialized in Middle Eastern and North African affairs, with an MA in Arabic and Oriental Studies from Uppsala University. He is the editor of Syria in Crisis, an online publication on the Syrian conflict published by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He has written several books and reports on Syria’s history, politics and opposition movements.

  • Erik Melander (Sweden) is a Professor at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. He is the Deputy Director of the Uppsala Conflict Data Programme and is also affiliated with the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, as Adjunct Professor of Research, and with Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, as a faculty member of its Rotary Peace and Conflict Studies Programme. He has published articles in a variety of journals, including the Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Studies Quarterly and the Journal of Peace Research.

  • Dr Zia Mian (Pakistan/United Kingdom) is a physicist with Princeton University’s Programme on Science and Global Security, where he directs the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia. His work focuses on nuclear weapons, arms control and disarmament, and nuclear energy issues in India and Pakistan. He is co-editor of the journal Science & Global Security and co-chair of the International Panel on Fissile Materials. He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2003 and since 2007.

  • Dr Gary Milante (United States) is Director of SIPRI’s Security and Development Programme. He has focused on the intersection of security and socio-economic development throughout his career as a researcher and policy advisor at SIPRI and the World Bank. From first principles based on theory of conflict and cooperation, to applied econometrics, statistical analysis and modelling, he has concentrated on making the complex problems associated with sequencing of institutional reforms, development portfolio design, strategic planning, and needs assessment accessible to policymakers and practitioners in the field, with an emphasis on the needs of fragile and conflict-affected states.

  • Dr Angela Muvumba Sellström (Uganda) is a researcher at the Nordic Africa Institute (NAI) and the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at the University of Uppsala. Her professional background includes 15 years of policy research experience on peace and security issues in Africa. Her doctoral dissertation (Uppsala University, 2015) examined the causes of armed group impunity for sexual violence. She is a co-editor of two volumes: The African Union and Its Institutions (Jacana Media, 2008) and HIV/AIDS and Society in South Africa (University of KwaZulu-Natal, 2008).

  • Dr Louise Olsson (Sweden) is Head of Policy and Research of the UN Security Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 Programme at the Folke Bernadotte Academy, where she leads the Research Working Group on UNSCR 1325, which seeks to promote more systematic empirical research on issues related to gender, peace and security. She obtained her PhD from the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University in 2007. Her publications include Gender Equality and UN Peace Operations in Timor-Leste (Brill, 2009) and the edited volume Gender, Peace and Security: Implementing UN Resolution 1325 (Routledge, 2015).

  • Dr Sam Perlo-Freeman (United Kingdom) is Head of the SIPRI Military Expenditure Project. Previously, he was a Senior Lecturer at the University of the West of England, working on defence and peace economics. His recent publications include ‘United Kingdom’ in Security Activities of External Actors in Africa (Oxford University Press, 2014), and ‘Military expenditure and the global culture of militarism’ in The Marketing of War in the Age of Neo-Militarism (Routledge, 2012). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2003.

  • Tariq Rauf (Canada) is the Director of the Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Programme at SIPRI. He was the Senior Advisor for the 2015 Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference and its Preparatory Committee. From 2002 to 2011, he was Head of Verification and Security Policy Coordination, Office Reporting to the Director General at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). He was Alternate Head of the IAEA Delegation to NPT Conferences and Preparatory Committee from 2003 to 2010. He received his education at the University of London (London School of Economics and Political Science, and King’s College London), Carleton University and the University of Toronto.

  • Phillip Patton Schell (Germany) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His research focuses on security issues related to the arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, with a regional specialization on East Asia and South Asia. His recent publications include A New START Model for Transparency in Nuclear Disarmament (United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR), 2013, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2012.

  • Camilla Schippa (Italy/Sweden) is the Director of the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP). Prior to joining the IEP she worked at the United Nations for over a decade. Until 2008 she was chief of office of the UN Office for Partnerships, where she guided the creation of strategic alliances between the UN and corporations, foundations and philanthropists. She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2010.

  • Katharina Seibel (Germany) is responsible for public relations and science management at the Freiburg Institute of Advanced Studies (FRIAS). In 2014–15 she assisted with research for the SIPRI China and Global Security Programme in Beijing, where she focused on Chinese foreign and security policies. She specializes in international law and security studies.

  • Timo Smit (Netherlands/Sweden) is a Research Assistant at SIPRI, working with the Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme. Prior to rejoining SIPRI, he worked for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS) and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly. At SIPRI he is responsible for maintaining SIPRI’s database on multilateral peace operations (including data-collection), and conducts research on trends in peacekeeping. He holds degrees from the University of Groningen and Uppsala University.

  • Dr Margareta Sollenberg (Sweden) is a Researcher with the Uppsala Conflict Data Programme (UCDP) and an Assistant Professor at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. She worked as the Project Leader at UCDP in 1994–2003 and has co-authored a number of articles and book chapters on armed conflicts. She contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 1995–2003 and 2013.

  • Kate A. Sullivan (United States) joined SIPRI in 2014. As Programme Coordinator for SIPRI’s Security and Development Programme, she is responsible for organizing the annual Stockholm Forum on Security and Development, supporting the programme’s research activities, and assisting the SIPRI Communications Department. Prior to joining SIPRI, she directed a start-up, non-profit organization focused on improving the lives of young people in developing countries through cross-sector collaboration.

  • Maaike Verbruggen (Netherlands) assisted with research for SIPRI’s Dual-use and Arms Trade Control Programme. She is currently working on a degree in Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Oslo, where she is writing a thesis about developments in arms procurement in India.

  • Professor Peter Wallensteen (Sweden) has been a Senior Professor of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University since 2012 and the Richard G. Starmann Sr Research Professor of Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, since 2006. He held the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University in 1985–2012. He directs the Uppsala Conflict Data Programme (UCDP) and the Special Programme on International Targeted Sanctions (SPITS). In September 2015 his monograph Toward Quality Peace will be published by Oxford University Press. He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1988.

  • Pieter D. Wezeman (Netherlands) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. Prior to rejoining SIPRI in 2006 he was a Senior Analyst for the Dutch Ministry of Defence in the field of proliferation of conventional and nuclear weapon technology. His recent publications have dealt with arms flows to sub-Saharan Africa, military capabilities in the Middle East and arms flows to Syria. He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1995.

  • Siemon T. Wezeman (Netherlands) is a Senior Fellow with the SIPRI Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. His areas of research include the monitoring of arms transfers, military spending and arms-producing companies, with a particular focus on the Asia–Pacific region, the use of weapons in conflicts, transparency in arms transfers, and the development of conventional military technologies. His recent publications include Arms Flows to Sub-Saharan Africa, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 30 (Dec. 2011, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1993.

  • Maha Yahya (Belgium/Lebanon) is a senior associate at the Carnegie Middle East Center, whose research focuses on citizenship, pluralism and social justice in the aftermath of Arab uprisings. Prior to joining Carnegie, she led work on Participatory Development and Social Justice at the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (UN-ESCWA) and worked with international and private sector organizations on socio-economic, development and post-conflict policies, in countries including Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, Oman and Saudi Arabia. She has two PhDs in social sciences and humanities from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and from the Architectural Association in London. Among other publications, she is the author of Towards Integrated Social Development Policies (UN–ESCWA, 2004) and co-editor of Secular Publicities (University of Michigan Press, 2010).

Citation (MLA):
"." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 18 Feb. 2019. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-miscMatter-9.xml>.
Citation (APA):
(2016). . In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 18 Feb. 2019, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-miscMatter-9.xml
Citation (Chicago):
"." In SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 18 Feb. 2019, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-miscMatter-9.xml
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