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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2017

SIPRI Yearbook 2017

About the authors

Chapter:
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2017

  • Dr Ian Anthony (United Kingdom) is the Director of SIPRI’s European Security Programme. Previously, he was the Director of SIPRI’s Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His recent publications include The Role of Parliamentarians in Building Security In and For Europe, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 44 (Dec. 2015, co-author) and Upstream of Future Crises: A Comprehensive Approach to European (External) Action (Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Nov. 2015, co-author).

  • Dr Sibylle Bauer (Germany) is the Director of Studies for Armament and Disarmament at SIPRI and the Director of SIPRI’s Dual-use and Arms Trade Control Programme. Since 2005 she has designed and implemented capacity-building activities in Europe and South East Asia, with a focus on legal and enforcement issues related to the enhancement of transit, brokering and export controls for dual-use items. Before joining SIPRI in 2003, she was a Researcher at the Institute for European Studies (ULB) in Brussels. Her recent publications include ‘The dual-use export control policy review: balancing security, trade and academic freedom in a changing world’, Non-proliferation Paper no. 48 (2016, co-author), ‘Designing and implementing appropriate and effective penalties for dual-use trade control offences’, Controlling the Trade of Strategic Goods: Sanctions and Penalties (University of Liège, 2016) and ‘Nuclear export control’, Routledge Handbook of Nuclear Proliferation and Policy (Routledge, 2015).

  • Emma Bjertén-Günther (Sweden) is a Researcher within Peace and Development at SIPRI. She works on topics related to gender, marginalization and insecurity, as well as conducts data collection on and analysis of anti-vehicle mine (AVM) incidents. She has an MA in Politics and International Relations with a specialization in Peace and Conflict Studies from Uppsala University. Prior to joining SIPRI she worked with gender mainstreaming within the Swedish Central Administration.

  • Dr Vincent Boulanin (France/Sweden) is a Researcher within Armament and Disarmament at SIPRI. He works on issues related to the production, use and control of emerging military and security technologies, notably cybersecurity and autonomous weapon systems. He has a PhD in Political Science from École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences) in Paris. His recent publications include Mapping the Development of Autonomy in Weapon Systems, SIPRI Research Report (Forthcoming 2017), ‘Mapping the debate on LAWS at the CCW: taking stock and moving forward’, Non-proliferation Paper no. 49 (Mar. 2016) and ‘Implementing Article 36 weapon reviews in the light of increasing autonomy in weapon systems’, SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security no. 2015/1 (Nov. 2015).

  • Mark Bromley (United Kingdom) is the Co-Director of SIPRI’s Dual-use and Arms Trade Control Programme, where his work focuses on national, regional and international efforts to regulate the international arms trade. Previously, he was a policy analyst for the British American Security Information Council (BASIC). His recent publications include ‘ICT surveillance systems: trade policy and the application of human security concerns’, Strategic Trade Review (Spring 2016, co-author), ‘The dual-use export control policy review: balancing security, trade and academic freedom in a changing world’, Non-proliferation Paper no. 48 (Mar. 2016, co-author) and ‘ATT-related outreach assistance in sub-Saharan Africa: identifying gaps and improving coordination’, SIPRI Background Paper (Feb. 2016, co-author).

  • Professor Michael Brzoska (Germany) is a retired Professor of Political Science, a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg and a Principal Investigator in the cluster of excellence on Integrated Climate Research and Analysis at the University of Hamburg. Trained as an economist and political scientist, he has published widely on issues related to the political economy of war and peace, arms trade and production, military spending, international sanctions and European security policy. His main research interest is currently the consequences of climate change for conflict, peace and security. Earlier positions include Director of the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg, Deputy Director at the Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC) and Co-Director of the Arms Transfers Project at SIPRI.

  • Dr Marina Caparini (Canada) is a Senior Researcher within Peace and Development at SIPRI. Her research focuses on peacebuilding and the nexus between security and development. She has conducted research on diverse aspects of security and justice governance in post-conflict and post-authoritarian contexts, including police development, intelligence oversight, civil-military relations and the regulation of private military and security companies. Recently, she has focused on police in peace support operations and capacity building, and policy responses to forced displacement, irregular migration, organized crime and violent extremism. Prior to joining SIPRI in December 2016, Caparini held senior positions at the Norwegian Institute for International Affairs, the International Center for Transitional Justice and the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces.

  • Dr Ian Davis (United Kingdom) is the Executive Editor of the SIPRI Yearbook and an Associate Senior Fellow within Armament and Disarmament at SIPRI. From 2014–16 he was the Director of SIPRI’s Editorial, Publications and Library Department, responsible for supervising a team of editors and managing the departmental budget and workflow. Prior to joining SIPRI, he held several senior positions and worked as an independent human security and arms-control consultant. He has a long record of research and publication on international and regional security issues and blogs on NATO-related issues. His recent publications include The British Bomb and NATO: Six Decades of Contributing to NATO’s Strategic Nuclear Deterrent (Nov. 2015).

  • Vitaly Fedchenko (Russia) is a Senior Researcher in SIPRI’s European Security Programme, responsible for nuclear security issues and the political, technological and educational dimensions of nuclear arms control and non-proliferation. Previously, he was a visiting researcher at SIPRI and worked at the Center for Policy Studies in Russia and the Institute for Applied International Research in Moscow. He is the author or co-author of several publications on nuclear forensics, nuclear security, international non-proliferation and disarmament assistance, nuclear forces and the international nuclear fuel cycle.

  • Dr Aude Fleurant (Canada/France) is the Director of SIPRI’s Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. Her research interests focus on the transformation of the military market and analysis of the interaction of supply and demand dynamics. Previously, she was the Director of Arms and Defence Economics at the Military Academy Strategic Research Institute in Paris. She has authored many articles on the arms industry and military expenditure during her tenures at the Military Academy and at SIPRI. Her recent publications include ‘Trends in world military expenditure, 2016’, SIPRI Fact Sheet (Apr. 2017, co-author) and ‘Trends in international arms transfers, 2016’, SIPRI Fact Sheet (Feb. 2017, co-author).

  • Dr Alexander Glaser (Germany) is an Associate Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. He works on nuclear energy and security policy, with a focus on nuclear non-proliferation and arms control. He is co-director of the University’s Programme on Science and Global Security, co-editor of the journal Science & Global Security, and co-chair of the International Panel on Fissile Materials, which publishes the annual Global Fissile Material Report. He is co-author of Unmaking the Bomb: A Fissile Material Approach to Nuclear Disarmament and Nonproliferation (MIT Press, 2014).

  • Dr Lina Grip (Sweden) is a Researcher in SIPRI’s European Security Programme, where she is responsible for the work on societal security. Previously, she was a Researcher in SIPRI’s Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. Her recent publications include ‘The global refugee crisis and its impact in Europe’, SIPRI Yearbook 2016, and ‘The acquisition of illicit firearms by terrorists in Europe: a case study of Denmark’ (Flemish Peace Institute, 2017).

  • Dr John Hart (United States) is a Senior Researcher and the Head of the Chemical and Biological Security Project in SIPRI’s Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme.

  • Yeonju Jung (Republic of Korea) is a Research Assistant within Peace and Development at SIPRI. She works on several projects relating to gender, security and development, as well as on an anti-vehicle mine (AVM) global mapping project. Prior to joining SIPRI, she spent two years at a local non-governmental organization in Cambodia, working with young people with disabilities resulting from landmines, war, accidents and polio. She also worked as a research coordinator in a one-year collaborative research project on ethnic minorities in north-eastern Cambodia. She has a master’s degree in the Social Anthropology of Development from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London.

  • Noel Kelly (Ireland) is the Coordinator for programmes and projects within Armament and Disarmament at SIPRI. These include the Arms Transfers and Military Expenditure Programme; the Biological, Chemical and Nuclear Weapons Programme; the Dual-use and Arms Trade Control Programme; and projects on emerging military and security technologies. He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2009, reporting on arms embargoes, the annual SIPRI military expenditure questionnaire findings and the findings of the United Nations reporting system on military expenditure. His recent publications include ‘The SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing and military services companies, 2015’, SIPRI Fact Sheet (Dec. 2016, co-author). Kelly further supports research work at SIPRI by helping maintain several databases common to these projects.

  • Shannon N. Kile (United States) is a Senior Researcher and the Head of the Nuclear Weapons Project in SIPRI’s Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His principal areas of research are nuclear arms control and non-proliferation, with a special interest in the nuclear programmes of Iran and North Korea. His work also looks at regional security issues related to Afghanistan and the Middle East. He has contributed to numerous SIPRI publications, including chapters on nuclear arms control and nuclear forces and weapon technology for the SIPRI Yearbook since 1994.

  • Ekaterina Klimenko (Kyrgyzstan) is a Researcher in SIPRI’s Russia and Eurasia Programme and the Coordinator for Peace and Conflict at SIPRI. Her research focuses on Russian policies in the Arctic and post-Soviet space (North Caucasus, Black Sea Region). Previously, she worked as a Research and Training Assistant at the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) Academy in Bishkek. Klimenko graduated from the University of Geneva. She is the author of a number of publications on Arctic and Caucasus regional security.

  • Hans M. Kristensen (Denmark) is the Director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) and a SIPRI Associate Senior Fellow. He is a frequent consultant to the news media and institutes on nuclear weapon matters, and is co-author of the ‘Nuclear notebook’ column in Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. His recent publications include ‘INF, New START and what really matters for US–Russian nuclear arms control’, Russia Matters (Feb. 2017), ‘The growing threat of nuclear war and the role of the health community’, World Medical Journal (Oct. 2016), and ‘Nuclear arsenals: current developments, trends and capabilities’, International Review of the Red Cross (co-author, July 2016).

  • Dr Jaïr van der Lijn (Netherlands) is the Head of SIPRI’s Peace Operations and Conflict Management Programme. He is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Netherlands Institute of International Relations ‘Clingendael’ and an Associate Fellow at the Radboud University in Nijmegen. His research interests include the future of peace operations, their evaluation and factors for success and failure, and comprehensive approaches in missions. His recent publications include Peacebuilding and Friction: Global and Local Encounters in Post-conflict Societies (Routledge, 2016, co-editor), ‘Peacekeepers under threat? Fatality trends in UN peace operations’, SIPRI Policy Brief (Sep. 2015, co-author) and African Directions: Towards an Equitable Partnership in Peace Operations (SIPRI, 2017, co-author).

  • Diego Lopes (Brazil) is a Guest Researcher in SIPRI’s Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. He holds a Master’s degree in Peace, Defense and International Security from São Paulo State University and is currently a PhD candidate at the same institution. His publications have mainly addressed issues of arms trade and transparency in military expenditure. Prior to SIPRI, he held research positions at the Group of Defense Studies and International Security (GEDES) and the Latin American Security and Defense Network (RESDAL).

  • Giovanna Maletta (Italy) is a Research Assistant in SIPRI’s Dual-use and Arms Trade Control Programme, following a European Union Non-proliferation Consortium internship at SIPRI. Previously, she was a Blue Book Trainee in the Disarmament, Non-proliferation and Arms Export Control Division of the European External Action Service (EEAS) in Brussels; an intern in the International Cooperation Branch of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in The Hague; and an intern at the Office of the Ambassador of Pakistan in Rome.

  • Professor Erik Melander (Sweden) is a Professor in the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. He directs the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP) and is the Deputy Program Leader of the East Asian Peace Program. His publications include articles on patterns of armed conflict, gender and war, geographic aspects of ethnic conflict, and the prevention of genocide. He regularly publishes in journals such as Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Studies Quarterly, European Journal of International Relations and Journal of Gender Studies.

  • Dr Zia Mian (Pakistan/United Kingdom) is the Co-Director of the Programme on Science and Global Security at Princeton University, where he also directs the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia. His work focuses on nuclear weapons, arms control and disarmament, and nuclear energy issues in India and Pakistan. He is co-editor of the journal Science & Global Security and co-chair of the International Panel on Fissile Materials. He is co-author of Unmaking the Bomb: A Fissile Material Approach to Nuclear Disarmament and Nonproliferation (MIT Press, 2014).

  • Dr Gary Milante (United States) is the Director of Studies for Peace and Development at SIPRI, an area of study that investigates the economic, social, political and environmental conditions necessary to build and sustain peace. From first principles based on conflict and cooperation theory, to applied econometrics, statistical analysis and modelling, Milante’s career has concentrated on making the complex problems associated with sequencing institutional reforms, portfolio design, strategic planning and needs assessments accessible to policymakers and practitioners with a special focus on the needs of fragile and conflict-affected states.

  • Dr Malin Mobjörk (Sweden) is a Senior Researcher within Peace and Development at SIPRI and the Head of SIPRI’s work on climate change and risk. A major focus of her work is the nexus of climate change, security and development. Her expertise includes natural resource-based violent conflicts, climate-induced migration, and policy organizations’ responses to climate risks. Her recent publications include the report Climate-Related Security Risks: Towards An Integrated Approach (SIPRI–Stockholm University, Oct. 2016, co-author), a research note in the Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, and an upcoming research paper in International Studies Review.

  • Associate Professor Desirée Nilsson (Sweden) is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. Her research focuses on conflict resolution and durable peace, with a particular emphasis on multiparty civil wars and linkages between different types of organized violence. She is part of the core group of the research project ‘Resolving Jihadist Conflicts? Religion, Civil War, and Prospects for Peace’, which is based at Uppsala University. Her work is published in journals such as Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research, International Studies Review, International Peacekeeping and International Interactions. She is an Associate Editor of Journal of Peace Research and Conflict Management and Peace Science and a councillor of the Peace Science Society (International).

  • Dr Sam Perlo-Freeman (United Kingdom/United States/Sweden) is a Senior Researcher in SIPRI’s Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. He is currently on leave of absence and working as the Program Manager for Global Arms Business and Corruption at the World Peace Foundation at Tufts University. During his nine years at SIPRI, he principally worked on military expenditure and the arms industry, in particular leading the project to extend SIPRI’s military expenditure data back to 1949. Previously, he was a Senior Lecturer at the University of the West of England, working on defence and peace economics. His recent publications include ‘SIPRI’s new long data-set on military expenditure: the successes and methodological pitfalls’, Defence and Peace Economics (Feb. 2017) and ‘Special treatment: UK Government support for the arms industry and trade’ (CAAT–SIPRI, Nov. 2016).

  • Tariq Rauf (Canada) was the Director of SIPRI’s Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Programme from March 2014 to March 2017 and is an internationally respected authority on nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation issues. He is currently working in Vienna on promoting entry-into-force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Rauf was the Senior Advisor to the Chair of the Disarmament Committee at the 2015 Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. From 2002–11, he was the Head of the Verification and Security Policy Coordination Office at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), reporting to the Director General. From 2002–10, he was also the Alternate Head of the IAEA Delegation to NPT Conferences; and a Non-Proliferation Expert with Canada’s NPT Delegation from 1987–2000. He received his education at the University of London (London School of Economics and Political Science, and King’s College London), Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada) and the University of Toronto.

  • Ambassador Michael Sahlin (Sweden) is a Distinguished Associate Fellow with SIPRI’s European Security Programme and the Coordinator of SIPRI’s Security Conference on Secure Cities in an Insecure World. He has had many different roles in the political and diplomatic arenas. As a Swedish diplomat, he has been the Ambassador to Azerbaijan, Turkey, the Former Republic of Yugoslavia and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), and Norway; he has had various assignments at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and he was State Secretary in the Ministry of Defence. Sahlin has also been the European Union Special Representative in the FYROM, and the Swedish Special Envoy to Sudan with a focus on the Comprehensive Peace Agreement. He was the founder and first Director General of the Folke Bernadotte Academy. He holds a PhD in Political Science from Uppsala University.

  • Camilla Schippa (Italy/Sweden) is the Director of the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP). She oversees the research and manages the activities of IEP’s offices in Sydney, New York, The Hague, Brussels, Harare and Mexico City. With 20 years of professional experience in building new initiatives for development and peace, Schippa currently sits on the Board of Directors of the Centre for Armed Violence Reduction, the Club de Madrid’s Shared Society expert group, and the GCERF Policy, Think & Do Tanks Constituency. She was a member of the United Nation’s expert reference group for the Global Consultation on Conflict, Violence and Disaster in the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Before joining IEP, Camilla held senior positions at the UN Secretariat for over a decade.

  • Timo Smit (Netherlands/Sweden) is a Researcher in SIPRI’s Peace Operations and Conflict Management Programme. He is responsible for maintaining SIPRI’s database on multilateral peace operations, including data collection, and conducts research on trends in peacekeeping. Prior to rejoining SIPRI in 2014, he worked for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS) and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly.

  • Dan Smith (United Kingdom) is the Director of SIPRI. He has a long record of research and publication on a wide range of conflict and peace issues. His current work focuses on the relationship between climate change and insecurity, on peace and security issues in the Middle East and on global conflict trends. He served four years in the United Nations Peacebuilding Fund Advisory Group, two of which (2010–11) were as the Chair. Since January 2014 he has also been a Professor of Peace & Conflict at the University of Manchester. He is the author of successive editions of atlases of politics, war and peace, and the Middle East, and of a blog on international politics.

  • Dr Margareta Sollenberg (Sweden) is a Researcher in the Uppsala Conflict Data Programme (UCDP) and an Assistant Professor at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. She worked as a Project Leader in the UCDP from 1994–2003 and has co-authored a number of articles and book chapters on armed conflicts. She contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 1995–2003, 2013 and 2015.

  • Professor Isak Svensson (Sweden) is a Professor at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University. His areas of expertise are international mediation in civil wars, the religious aspects of conflict resolution processes, and the dynamics of strategic nonviolent conflicts. Previously, he was the Director of Research at the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Otago. He has published in Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Conflict Resolution, European Journal of International Relations and International Negotiation, among others. His latest books include International Mediation Bias and Peacemaking: Taking Sides in Civil Wars (Routledge, 2015) and Ending Holy Wars: Religion and Conflict Resolution in Civil Wars (University of Queensland Press, 2012).

  • Dr Nan Tian (South Africa) is a Researcher in SIPRI’s Arms and Military Expenditure Programme, where he is responsible for monitoring and managing the SIPRI Military Expenditure Database. His research interests focus on the causes and impact of military expenditure and civil war. Previously, he worked as an Economist on climate change at the World-Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and was a Lecturer at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He has published in Defence and Peace Economics and The Economics of Peace and Security Journal.

  • Dr Pedro Valenzuela (Colombia) is a Full Professor at the School of Political Science and International Relations, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá. Previously, he was the Director of the Institute of Human Rights and Peace-building and of the Graduate Program in Conflict Resolution at the same university. He has a PhD in Peace and Conflict Research from Uppsala University, Sweden. His areas of research include peacebuilding and reconciliation at the grassroots level, peace processes, and non-violent resistance.

  • Maaike Verbruggen (Netherlands) is a Research Assistant at SIPRI working on issues concerning emerging military and security technologies, most notably autonomous weapon systems and drones. She is currently working on a project mapping the state of autonomy in weapon systems. Before joining SIPRI in 2016, she completed an MPhil in Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Oslo and held internships in SIPRI’s Dual-Use and Arms Trade Control Programme, at the United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA), and at the Department of Non-Proliferation, Arms Control, Disarmament and Arms Export Controls at the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  • Pieter D. Wezeman (Netherlands) is a Senior Researcher in SIPRI’s Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. Prior to rejoining SIPRI in 2006 he was a Senior Analyst for the Dutch Ministry of Defence, looking at the proliferation of conventional and nuclear weapon technology. Among other things, he has published on arms flows to sub-Saharan Africa, military expenditure and capabilities in the Middle East, arms flows to Syria and multilateral arms embargoes. His recent publications include ‘Trends in world military expenditure, 2016’, SIPRI Fact Sheet (Apr. 2017, co-author) and ‘Trends in international arms transfers, 2016’, SIPRI Fact Sheet (Feb. 2017, co-author). In 2016 and 2017 he was a technical expert for the United Nations Group of Governmental Experts that reviewed the UN report on military expenditure.

  • Siemon T. Wezeman (Netherlands) is a Senior Researcher in SIPRI’s Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. His areas of research include the monitoring of arms transfers, military spending and arms-producing companies, with a particular focus on the Asia–Pacific and the former Soviet regions, the use of weapons in conflicts, transparency in arms transfers, and the development of conventional military technologies. His recent publications include ‘Military capabilities in the Arctic: a new cold war in the high North?’, SIPRI Background Paper (Oct. 2016), ‘Trends in world military expenditure, 2016’, SIPRI Fact Sheet (Apr. 2017, co-author) and ‘Trends in international arms transfers, 2016’, SIPRI Fact Sheet (Feb. 2017, co-author).

Citation (MLA):
"." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 17 Oct. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198811800/sipri-9780198811800-miscMatter-9.xml>.
Citation (APA):
(2016). . In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2017: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 17 Oct. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198811800/sipri-9780198811800-miscMatter-9.xml
Citation (Chicago):
"." In SIPRI Yearbook 2017: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 17 Oct. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198811800/sipri-9780198811800-miscMatter-9.xml
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