We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2010

SIPRI Yearbook 2010

VI. Europe

Chapter:
5. Military expenditure
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2010
Author(s):
Sam Perlo-Freeman, Olawale Ismail, Carina Solmirano

Military expenditure in Europe was $386 billion in 2009, an increase of 2.7 per cent in real terms over 2008. The effect of the global economic crisis on military expenditure in Europe varied. In Western Europe, the recent trend of flat or slightly rising spending was largely unchanged, as governments chose to sustain public spending to boost the economy.84 However, in Central and Eastern Europe—where in may cases the crisis has struck economies harder and where governments’ had insufficient reserves and levels of credit-worthiness to maintain large deficits—a number of countries made significant cuts to military spending as a direct result of the crisis, including Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Lithuania, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia and Ukraine.85 Some of the richer Central European countries—the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland—increased spending.

Citation (MLA):
Perlo-Freeman, Sam, Olawale Ismail, and Carina Solmirano. "5. Military expenditure." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-div1-43.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Perlo-Freeman, S., Ismail, O., & Solmirano, C. (2016). 5. Military expenditure. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-div1-43.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Perlo-Freeman, Sam, Olawale Ismail, and Carina Solmirano. "5. Military expenditure." In SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-div1-43.xml
The SIPRI Yearbook online requires a subscription or purchase to access its full text (purchase of a print copy of the 2010-2016 yearbooks also provides access to some content). Unsubscribed users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.
Please log in to access full text content, or find out more about how to subscribe.
If you think you should have access to this service, please contact your librarian.