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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2010

SIPRI Yearbook 2010

V. Conclusions

Chapter:
7. International arms transfers
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2010
Author(s):
Paul Holtom, Mark Bromley, Pieter D. Wezeman, Siemon T. Wezeman

Since the end of the cold war, the five largest suppliers of major conventional weapons have remained the same: the USA, Russia, Germany, France and the UK. However, their share of global arms exports is slowly declining as a number of states are challenging the established second tier of arms suppliers. It has become increasingly difficult to compare the official data on export orders and actual arms exports published by the major arms suppliers, demonstrating the continued utility of SIPRI data for monitoring and measuring international arms transfers. It is expected that in the coming years SIPRI data will show a change with regard to the largest importer, as China will drop from the top spot. Asian and Middle Eastern countries are expected to remain among the world’s largest importers.

Citation (MLA):
Holtom, Paul, Mark Bromley, Pieter D. Wezeman, and Siemon T. Wezeman. "7. International arms transfers." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 16 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-div1-62.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Holtom, P., Bromley, M., Wezeman, P., & Wezeman, S. (2016). 7. International arms transfers. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 16 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-div1-62.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Holtom, Paul, Mark Bromley, Pieter D. Wezeman, and Siemon T. Wezeman. "7. International arms transfers." In SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 16 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-div1-62.xml
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