We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2010

SIPRI Yearbook 2010

About the authors

Chapter:
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2010

  • Dr Ian Anthony (United Kingdom) is SIPRI Research Coordinator and Director of the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His SIPRI publications include Reforming Nuclear Export Controls: The Future of the Nuclear Suppliers Group, SIPRI Research Report no. 22 (2007, co-author), Reducing Threats at the Source: A European Perspective on Cooperative Threat Reduction, SIPRI Research Report no. 19 (2004) and Russia and the Arms Trade (1998, editor). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1988.

  • Alyson J. K. Bailes (United Kingdom) is a Visiting Professor at the University of Iceland, specializing in security studies. After a 30-year career in the British Diplomatic Service she was Director of SIPRI from 2002 to 2007. She has written extensively on European, Nordic and Arctic security issues; her latest book is an anthology of speeches, Through European Eyes (University of Iceland Press, 2009). She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2003.

  • Dr Sibylle Bauer (Germany) is Head of SIPRI’s Export Control Project and Senior Researcher with the Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. Previously, she was a Researcher with the Institute for European Studies in Brussels. Her extensive publications on export control and armaments issues include The European Union Code of Conduct on Arms Exports: Improving the Annual Report, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 8 (2004, co-author) and chapters in The Arms Trade (Routledge, 2010) and From Early Warning To Early Action? The Debate on the Enhancement of the EU’s Crisis Response Capability Continues (European Commission, 2008, as co-author). She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2004.

  • Dr Stephanie Blair (Canada) is an Associated Senior Research Fellow at SIPRI and co-director of the SIPRI Project on the Civilian Contribution to Peace Operations. She served in both the OSCE Kosovo Verification Mission and the UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK), was on the team that established the Lester B. Pearson Canadian International Peacekeeping Training Centre (PPC), and co-founded the International Association of Peacekeeping Training Centres (IAPTC). She received her PhD in War Studies from King’s College London. She is the author or co-author of several articles and publications on peacekeeping and stability operations.

  • Nenne Bodell (Sweden) is Director of the SIPRI Library and Documentation Department and of the SIPRI Arms Control and Disarmament Documentary Survey Programme. She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2003.

  • Mark Bromley (United Kingdom) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme, where his work focuses on European arms exports and export controls and South American arms acquisitions. Previously, he was a Policy Analyst for the British American Security Information Council (BASIC). His publications include ’The Europeanisation of arms export policy in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Poland’, European Security (June 2007), The Impact on Domestic Policy of the EU Code of Conduct on Arms Exports: The Czech Republic, the Netherlands and Spain, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 21 (May 2008), and Air Transport and Destabilizing Commodity Flows, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 24 (May 2009, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2004.

  • Dr Peter Clevestig (Sweden) is a Senior Researcher with the Chemical and Biological Security Project of the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His research interests include laboratory biosecurity and policies, biological warfare and bioterrorism, microbial forensics and dual-use research of concern. He has authored several scientific articles and book chapters on bioterrorism, security aspects of emerging biotechnology and disease surveillance. He is the author of the Handbook of Applied Biosecurity for Life Science Laboratories (2009). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2008.

  • Dr Andrew Cottey (United Kingdom) is Senior Lecturer and Jean Monnet Chair in European Political Integration, Department of Government, University College Cork. He has been a NATO Research Fellow, a Research Associate at the International Institute for Strategic Studies and a Guest Researcher at SIPRI. His publications include Security in the New Europe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), Reshaping Defence Diplomacy: New Roles for Military Cooperation and Assistance, Adelphi Paper 365 (Oxford University Press/International Institute for Strategic Studies, 2004) and Subregional Cooperation in the New Europe: Building Security, Prosperity and Solidarity from the Barents to the Black Sea (Macmillan/EastWest Institute, 1999). He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2003, 2004 and 2006.

  • Vitaly Fedchenko (Russia) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme, with responsibility for nuclear security issues and the political, technological and educational dimensions of nuclear arms control and non-proliferation. Previously, he was a visiting researcher at SIPRI and worked at the Center for Policy Studies in Russia and the Institute for Applied International Research in Moscow. He is the author or co-author of several publications on nuclear forensics, nuclear security and verification, and the international nuclear fuel cycle, including Reforming Nuclear Export Controls: The Future of the Nuclear Suppliers Group, SIPRI Research Report no. 22 (2007, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2005.

  • Dr Bates Gill (United States) is the seventh Director of SIPRI. Before joining SIPRI in October 2007, he held the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. He previously served as a Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies and inaugural Director of the Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution. He has a long record of research and publication on international and regional security issues, particularly regarding arms control, non-proliferation, strategic nuclear relations, peacekeeping and military-technical development, especially with regard to China and Asia. His most recent publications include Asia’s New Multilateralism: Cooperation, Competition, and the Search for Community (Columbia University Press, 2009, co-editor) and Rising Star: China’s New Security Diplomacy (Brookings, 2007, revised edition 2010).

  • Dr Alexander Glaser (Germany) is Assistant Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. He is a participant in the university’s Program on Science and Global Security and works with the International Panel on Fissile Materials, which publishes the annual Global Fissile Material Report. He received his PhD in physics in 2005 from Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany. Between 2001 and 2003 he was an SSRC/MacArthur Fellow with the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During 2000 and 2001 he was an adviser to the German Federal Ministry of Environment and Reactor Safety. He is associate editor of Science & Global Security. He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2007.

  • Dr Bharath Gopalaswamy (India) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. Previously, he was a postdoctoral associate at Cornell University’s Peace Studies Program where he worked on the technical aspects of foreign policy issues. He has a PhD in mechanical engineering with a specialization in numerical acoustics. He has worked at the Indian Space Research Organisation’s High-Altitude Test Facilities and for EADS Astrium.

  • James E. Goodby (United States) is a Research Fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution and a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He is the author and editor of several books dealing with control of nuclear weapons and European security issues. As a US Foreign Service Officer he served as ambassador to Finland, head of the US delegation to the Stockholm Conference on confidence-building measures in Europe, vice-chair of the US START delegation, Special Representative of the President for Nuclear Security and Disarmament, and held diplomatic assignments with US missions to NATO and the European Communities.

  • Lotta Harbom (Sweden) is a Research Assistant with the Uppsala Conflict Data Program at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University. She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2005.

  • John Hart (United States) is a Senior Researcher and Head of the Chemical and Biological Security Project of the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. He is also a doctoral candidate in military sciences at the Finnish National Defence University. His publications include Chemical Weapon Destruction in Russia: Political, Legal and Technical Aspects (1998, co-editor) and Historical Dictionary of Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Warfare (Scarecrow Press, 2007, co-author). His recent publications include a chapter on WMD inspection and verification regimes in Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: the Future of International Non-Proliferation Policy (University of Georgia Press, 2009, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 1997, 1998 and since 2002.

  • Dr Paul Holtom (United Kingdom) is the Director of the SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme. Previously, he was a Research Fellow with the University of Glamorgan Centre for Border Studies. His most recent publications include Transparency in Transfers of Small Arms and Light Weapons: Reports to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms, 2003-2006, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 22 (2008), Implementation of the EU Common Position on the Control of Arms Brokering (SEESAC, 2009) and ’Nothing to report: the lost promise of the UN Register of Conventional Arms’, Contemporary Security Policy (April 2010). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2007.

  • Dr Olawale Ismail (Nigeria) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme and Project Coordinator for the SIPRI Africa Security and Governance Project. He holds a PhD in peace studies from the University of Bradford. He previously worked with the Conflict, Security and Development Group (CSDG), King’s College London and for the SIPRI Project on Budgeting for the Military Sector in Africa. His recent publications include Post-War Regimes and State Reconstruction in Liberia and Sierra Leone (CODESRIA, 2009, co author), Dynamics of Post-conflict Reconstruction and Peace Building in West Africa: Between Change and Security (Nordic Africa Institute, 2009) and ’The dialectics of “junctions” and “bases”: youth, “securo-commerce” and the crises of order in downtown Lagos’, Security Dialogue (2009).

  • Dr Susan T. Jackson (USA) joined SIPRI’s Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme in July 2009 as Head of the Arms Production Project. She holds a PhD from the University of Arizona on the linkages between state and corporate global competitiveness and military spending. Prior to graduate school, she worked for the Foreign Policy Studies programme of the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. She lived in Turkey for more than three years, where her work included editing and translating for a daily economic and political news digest for business executives.

  • Krister Karlsson (USA) was an intern with the SIPRI Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme in 2009-10. He is completing a master’s degree at the Uppsala University Department of Peace and Conflict Research.

  • Noel Kelly (Ireland) has been a Research Assistant with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production and Arms Transfers programmes since January 2008. He is responsible for the electronic archive common to these three research areas and maintains the SIPRI reporting system for military expenditure. He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2009.

  • Shannon N. Kile (USA) is a Senior Researcher and Head of the Nuclear Weapons Project of the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His principal areas of research are nuclear arms control and non-proliferation with a special interest in Iran and North Korea. He has contributed to numerous SIPRI publications, including chapters on nuclear arms control and nuclear forces and weapon technology for the SIPRI Yearbook since 1995. His recent publications include, as editor, Europe and Iran: Perspectives on Non-proliferation, SIPRI Research Report no. 21 (2005).

  • Hans M. Kristensen (Denmark) is Director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists (FAS). He is co-author of the ’Nuclear notebook’ column in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. His recent publications include ’Counter-proliferation in US nuclear strategy’, in US Nuclear Strategy and the Implications for Global Security (Dalhouse University: Centre for Foreign Policy Studies, 2009), and Obama and the Nuclear War Plan (FAS, 2010). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2001.

  • Dr Zdzislaw Lachowski (Poland) is a Senior Fellow with the SIPRI Euro-Atlantic Security Programme. His research interests include the problems of European military security and arms control as well as European politico-military integration. He is the co-editor of International Security in a Time of Change: Threats-Concepts-Institutions (Nomos, 2004), author of Confidence- and Security-Building Measures in the New Europe, SIPRI Research Report no. 18 (2004) and Foreign Military Bases in Eurasia, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 18 (2007), and lead author of Tools for Building Confidence on the Korean Peninsula (2007). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1992.

  • Tim Macintyre (Australia) is Head of Global Research at the Institute for Economics and Peace, which produces the Global Peace Index. His role is to commission, direct and manage research for the Institute as well as oversee publication of periodical materials. Prior to joining the Institute, he was employed by research companies Gartner and the Economist Intelligence Unit. He holds a master’s degree in international studies from the University of Sydney and a Bachelor of Commerce (international business) from the University of Adelaide.

  • Zia Mian (Pakistan/United Kingdom) is a physicist with Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, where he directs the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia. For the past decade his work has focused on nuclear weapons, arms control and disarmament, and nuclear energy issues in Pakistan and India. He has previously worked at the Union of Concerned Scientists, the Sustainable Development Policy Institute and Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad. He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2003 and in 2007-2009.

  • Ivana Mićić (Belgium) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme with expertise in export control and on South Eastern Europe. She plays a key role in implementing and developing SIPRI’s projects on strengthening capacities to investigate and prosecute export control violations in South Eastern Europe and strengthening export controls systems.

  • Dr Sam Perlo-Freeman (United Kingdom) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme, responsible for monitoring data on military expenditure worldwide. Previously, he was a Senior Lecturer at the University of the West of England, working in the field of defence and peace economics. His recent publications include ’The demand for military expenditure in developing countries: hostility vs. capability’, Defence and Peace Economics (August 2008, co-author), and a chapter on the UK’s arms industry in The Global Arms Trade: A Handbook (Routledge, 2009). He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2003, 2004, 2008 and 2009.

  • Camilla Schippa (Italy) is a Director of the Institute for Economics and Peace, where she manages the development of the Global Peace Index as well as the research carried out internationally on and around the index. Until early 2008 she was chief of office of the United Nations Office for Partnerships, where she guided the creation of strategic alliances between the UN and corporations, foundations and philanthropists.

  • Kirsten Soder (Germany) was a Researcher with the SIPRI Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme. Since 2006 she has managed the SIPRI Multilateral Peace Operations Database and contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook and the Center on International Cooperation’s Annual Review of Global Peace Operations. She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2007.

  • Carina Solmirano (Argentina) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme responsible for monitoring military expenditure in Latin America, the Middle East and South Asia. Prior to joining SIPRI, she worked at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, Colorado, where she is a doctoral candidate. She has also worked on arms control issues at the Argentine NGO Asociacion para Politicas Publicas and as an adviser at the Argentine Senate.

  • Dr Ekaterina Stepanova (Russia) is a Lead Researcher on armed conflicts, terrorism and the political economy of conflicts at the Institute of the World Economy and International Relations (IMEMO) of the Russian Academy of Sciences. She also lectures at the European University in Saint Petersburg (EUSP) and at the European Peace University (EPU) in Austria. In 2007-2009, she led the SIPRI Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme. She is the author of four monographs, including Terrorism in Asymmetrical Conflict: Ideological and Structural Aspects, SIPRI Research Report no. 23 (2008), also published in Spanish (Argentinian Ministry of Defence, 2009) and Russian (Nauchnaya kniga, 2010). The latest of her co-edited volumes is Terrorism: Patterns of Internationalization (Sage, 2009). She serves on the editorial boards of the journals Terrorism and Political Violence and Security Index. She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2008.

  • Professor Peter Wallensteen (Sweden) has held the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University since 1985 and has been the Richard G. Starmann Sr Research Professor of Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame since 2006. He directs the Uppsala Conflict Data Program and the Special Program on the Implementation of Targeted Sanctions. The second, updated edition of his book Understanding Conflict Resolution: War, Peace and the Global System (Sage) was published in 2007. He is co-editor of International Sanctions: Between Words and Wars in the Global System (Frank Cass, 2005) and Third Parties in Conflict Prevention (Gidlunds, 2008). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1988.

  • Pieter D. Wezeman (Netherlands) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme. He rejoined SIPRI in 2006, having previously worked at the institute from 1994 to 2003. From 2003 to 2006 he was a Senior Analyst for the Dutch Ministry of Defence in the field of proliferation of conventional and nuclear weapon technology. He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 1995-2003 and since 2007.

  • Siemon T. Wezeman (Netherlands) is a Senior Fellow with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme, where he has worked since 1992. Among his publications are several relating to international transparency in arms transfers, The Future of the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 4 (August 2003), and Cluster Weapons: Necessity or Convenience? (Pax Christi Netherlands, 2005, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1993.

  • Sharon Wiharta (Indonesia) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme, where she leads research on peacekeeping and peacebuilding issues. Her particular areas of interest are transitional justice and efforts to re-establish the rule of law in post-conflict situations. She is currently co-directing the SIPRI Project on the Civilian Contribution to Peace Operations. Her publications include Peace Operations: Trends, Progress and Prospects (Georgetown University Press, 2008, co-editor), The Transition to a Just Order: Establishing Local Ownership after Conflict (Folke Bernadotte Academy, 2007, co-author) and The Effectiveness of Foreign Military Assets in Natural Disaster Response (2007, lead author). She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2002.

Citation (MLA):
"." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 16 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-miscMatter-10.xml>.
Citation (APA):
(2016). . In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 16 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-miscMatter-10.xml
Citation (Chicago):
"." In SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 16 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-miscMatter-10.xml
The SIPRI Yearbook online requires a subscription or purchase to access its full text (purchase of a print copy of the 2010-2016 yearbooks also provides access to some content). Unsubscribed users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.
Please log in to access full text content, or find out more about how to subscribe.
If you think you should have access to this service, please contact your librarian.