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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2010

SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Contents

Chapter:
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2010

    • Preface xv
    • Acknowledgements xvi
    • Abstracts xvii
    • Abbreviations and conventions xxi
    • Introduction. International security, armaments and disarmament in 2010 3bates gill
      1. I Overview 3
      2. II SIPRI Yearbook 2010: highlights and findings 6
      3. III Conclusions 14
    • 1. A world without nuclear weapons: fantasy or necessity? 17james e. goodby
      1. I Introduction 17
      2. II Staged reductions in Russian and US nuclear weapons 19
      3. III Broadening the circle: involving other nuclear-armed states in a campaign to eliminate nuclear weapons 20
      4. IV Ancillary agreements necessary to support and sustain a world without nuclear weapons 24
      5. V Deterrence in a world without nuclear weapons 25
      6. VI Governance and institution building: how much must change? 27
      7. VII How political and doctrinal changes pave the way for international agreements: the US case 30
      8. VIII Conclusions: looking ahead 33
    • Part I. Security and conflicts, 2009
    • 2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence 37ekaterina stepanova
      • I Introduction 37
      • II Crime and criminal violence: data, methodology and global trends 38
      • III Transnational crime in armed conflict settings 46
      • IV A new type of armed conflict? 55
      • V Conclusions 59
    • Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2000–2009 61lotta harbom and peter wallensteen
      1. I Global patterns in major armed conflicts 61
      2. II Regional patterns 62
      3. III Changes in the table of conflicts for 2009 65
      4. IV Definitions, sources and methods 68
      5. Figure 2A.1. Regional distribution and total number of major armed conflicts, 2000–2009 63
      6. Figure 2A.2. Timeline of major armed conflicts, 2000–2009 64
      7. Table 2A.1. Number of major armed conflicts, by region and type, 2000–2009 62
      8. Table 2A.2. Number of locations of major armed conflict, by region, 2000–2009 62
      9. Table 2A.3. Major armed conflicts in 2009 72
    • Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2010 77tim macintyre and camilla schippa
      1. I Introduction 77
      2. II Highlights and changes 79
      3. III Methodology and data sources 80
      4. IV Investigating the set of potential determinants 82
      5. Table 2B.1. The Global Peace Index 2010 78
      6. Table 2B.2. Countries with the greatest change in Global Peace Index score, 2009–10 80
      7. Table 2B.3. Measures of ongoing domestic and international conflict 81
      8. Table 2B.4. Measures of societal safety and security 81
      9. Table 2B.5. Measures of militarization 82
      10. Table 2B.6. Correlation between the Global Peace Index 2010 and the indicators of peace and its possible determinants 84
    • 3. Civilian roles in peace operations 87sharon wiharta and stephanie blair
      1. I Introduction 87
      2. II Addressing the civilian capacity gap in peace operations Common challenges and institutional responses 89
      3. III The UN Mission in Sudan 101
      4. IV Conclusions 106
      5. Figure 3.1. Number of civilians deployed to United Nations peace operations, 2000–2009 88
    • Appendix 3A. Multilateral peace operations, 2009 107kirsten soder and krister karlsson
      1. I Introduction 107
      2. II Global trends 107
      3. III Regional trends 112
      4. IV Table of multilateral peace operations 115
      5. Figure 3A.1. Number of peace operations, by conducting organization, 2000–2009 108
      6. Figure 3A.2. Number of personnel deployed to peace operations, 2000–2009 109
      7. Figure 3A.3. The top 10 contributors of troops to peace operations, 2009 110
      8. Figure 3A.4. The top 10 contributors of civilian police to peace operations, 2009 112
      9. Table 3A.1. Number of peace operations and personnel deployed, by region and organization, 2009 113
      10. Table 3A.2. Multilateral peace operations, 2009 118
    • 4. Euro-Atlantic security and institutions: rebalancing in the midst of global change 149alyson j. k. bailes and andrew cottey
      1. I Introduction 149
      2. II The North Atlantic Treaty Organization 150
      3. III The European Union 161
      4. IV Renewing pan-European security cooperation? 167
      5. V Conclusions 173
      6. Table 4.1. Selected European Union member states’ personnel contributions to Common Security and Defence Policy missions 164
    • Part II. Military spending and armaments, 2009
    • 5. Military expenditure 177sam perlo-freeman, olawale ismail and carina solmirano
      1. I Introduction 177
      2. II Africa 178
      3. III Latin America 182
      4. IV The Middle East 186
      5. V Asia and Oceania 189
      6. VI Europe 192
      7. VII North America 196
      8. VIII Conclusions 199
      9. Figure 5.1. World and regional military expenditure estimates,2000–2009 178
      10. Table 5.1. British expenditure and troop numbers in Afghanistan, 2003–2009 194
      11. Table 5.2. US outlays for the Department of Defense and total national defence, financial years 2001, 2003, 2006–2010 198
    • Appendix 5A. Military expenditure data, 2000–2009 201sam perlo-freeman, olawale ismail, noel kelly and carina solmirano
      1. I Introduction 201
      2. II Regional trends and major spenders 201
      3. III Tables of military expenditure 207
      4. Box 5A.1. World trends in military expenditure 202
      5. Box 5A.2. Trends in military spending in Africa 204
      6. Box 5A.3. Trends in military spending in the Americas 204
      7. Box 5A.4. Trends in military spending in Asia and Oceania 205
      8. Box 5A.5. Trends in military spending in Europe 205
      9. Box 5A.6. Trends in military spending in the Middle East 206
      10. Table 5A.1. The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure in 2009 203
      11. Table 5A.2. Military expenditure by region, by international organization and by income group, 2000–2009 214
      12. Table 5A.3. Military expenditure by country, in local currency, 2000–2009 218
      13. Table 5A.4. Military expenditure by country, in constant US dollars for 2000–2009 and current US dollars for 2009 225
      14. Table 5A.5. Military expenditure by country as percentage of gross domestic product, 2000–2008 232
    • Appendix 5B. The reporting of military expenditure data 243noel kelly
      1. I Introduction 243
      2. II The reporting systems 243
      3. III Trends in reporting military expenditure, 2001–2009 245
      4. IV The reporting of military expenditure data in 2009 247
      5. Table 5B.1. Number of countries reporting their military expenditure to the United Nations and SIPRI, 2001–2009 246
      6. Table 5B.2. Reporting of military expenditure data to the United Nations and SIPRI, by region, 2009 248
    • 6. Arms production 251susan t. jackson
      1. I Introduction 251
      2. II The SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies, 2008 252
      3. III Mergers and acquisitions, 2009 262
      4. IV The limited impact of the financial crisis on the arms industry 265
      5. V Conclusions: continuity despite the crisis 271
      6. Table 6.1. Trends in arms sales of companies in the SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies, 2002–2008 252
      7. Table 6.2. Regional and national shares of arms sales for the SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies, 2008 compared to 2007 254
      8. Table 6.3. Companies in the SIPRI Top 100 with the largest increases in arms sales in 2008 256
      9. Table 6.4. The largest acquisitions within OECD arms industries, 2009 262
    • Appendix 6A. The SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies, 2008 272susan t. jackson and the sipri arms industry network
      1. I Selection criteria and sources of data 272
      2. II Definitions 272
      3. III Calculations 273
      4. Table 6A.1. The SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies in the world excluding China, 2008 275
    • Appendix 6B. Major arms industry acquisitions, 2009 281susan t. jackson
      1. Table 6B.1. Major acquisitions in the OECD arms industries, 2009 281
    • 7. International arms transfers 285paul holtom, mark bromley, pieter d.wezeman and siemon t. wezeman
      1. I Introduction 285
      2. II Major supplier developments, 2009 287
      3. III Arms transfers to North Africa 296
      4. IV Arms transfers to Iraq 302
      5. V Conclusions 305
      6. Figure 7.1. The trend in international transfers of major conventional weapons, 2000–2009 286
      7. Table 7.1. The five largest suppliers of major conventional weapons and their main recipients, 2005–2009 287
    • Appendix 7A. The suppliers and recipients of major conventional weapons, 2005–2009 306the sipri arms transfers programme
      1. I Introduction 306
      2. II Sources and methods for arms transfers data 306
      3. Table 7A.1. The recipients of major conventional weapons, 2005–2009 311
      4. Table 7A.2. The suppliers of major conventional weapons, 2005–2009 315
      5. Table 7A.3. The 10 largest recipients of major conventional weapons and their suppliers, 2005–2009 317
      6. Table 7A.4. The 10 largest suppliers of major conventional weapons and their destinations, by region, 2005–2009 318
    • Appendix 7B. The financial value of the arms trade, 1999–2008 319mark bromley
      1. Table 7B.1. The financial value of global arms exports according to national government and industry sources, 1999–2008 320
    • Appendix 7C. Transparency in arms transfers 322mark bromley and paul holtom
      1. I Introduction 322
      2. II The United Nations Register of Conventional Arms 322
      3. III National and regional reports on arms exports 325
      4. IV Publishing information on brokering licences 327
      5. Figure 7C.1. Number of reports submitted to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms (UNROCA), 1999–2008 323
      6. Table 7C.1. Numbers of EU member states submitting a complete data set to the EU annual report, 2004–2009 326
      7. Table 7C.2. States participating in international, regional, and national reporting mechanisms which aim, in whole or in part, to increase the quality of publicly available information on international arms transfers, 2007–2009 329
    • 8. World nuclear forces 333shannon n. kile, vitaly fedchenko, bharath gopalaswamy and hans m. kristensen
      1. I Introduction 333
      2. II US nuclear forces 334
      3. III Russian nuclear forces 342
      4. IV British nuclear forces 348
      5. V French nuclear forces 351
      6. VI Chinese nuclear forces 353
      7. VII Indian nuclear forces 356
      8. VIII Pakistani nuclear forces 360
      9. IX Israeli nuclear forces 363
      10. X North Korea’s military nuclear capabilities 364
      11. XI Conclusions 366
      12. Table 8.1. World nuclear forces, January 2010 334
      13. Table 8.2. US nuclear forces, January 2010 336
      14. Table 8.3. Russian nuclear forces, January 2010 344
      15. Table 8.4. British nuclear forces, January 2010 350
      16. Table 8.5. French nuclear forces, January 2010 352
      17. Table 8.6. Chinese nuclear forces, January 2010 354
      18. Table 8.7. Indian nuclear forces, January 2010 358
      19. Table 8.8. Pakistani nuclear forces, January 2010 362
      20. Table 8.9. Israeli nuclear forces, January 2010 364
    • Appendix 8A. Global stocks of fissile materials, 2009 367alexander glaser and zia mian
      1. Table 8A.1. Global stocks of highly enriched uranium (HEU), 2009 367
      2. Table 8A.2. Global stocks of separated plutonium, 2009 369
    • Appendix 8B. Nuclear explosions, 1945–2009 371vitaly fedchenko
      1. I Introduction 371
      2. II The nuclear test in North Korea 371
      3. III Estimated number of nuclear explosions, 1945–2009 374
      4. Table 8B.1. Data on North Korea’s nuclear explosion, 25 May 2009 372
      5. Table 8B.2. Estimated number of nuclear explosions, 1945–2009 375
    • Part III. Non-proliferation, arms control and disarmament, 2009
    • 9. Nuclear arms control and non-proliferation 379shannon n. kile
      1. I Introduction 379
      2. II Russian–US strategic nuclear arms control 380
      3. III Iran and nuclear proliferation concerns 385
      4. IV The impasse over North Korea’s nuclear programme 390
      5. V Proliferation concerns in Syria and Myanmar 393
      6. VI Developments related to multilateral treaties and initiatives 395
      7. VII New nuclear weapon-free zones 399
      8. VIII Conclusions 401
      9. Table 9.1. Summary of Russian–US nuclear arms reduction treaties’ force limits 380
      10. Table 9.2. Nuclear weapon-free zone treaties 400
    • 10. Reducing security threats from chemical and biological materials 403john hart and peter clevestig
      1. I Introduction 403
      2. II The threats posed by chemical and biological material 404
      3. III Biological weapon arms control and disarmament 406
      4. IV Chemical weapon arms control and disarmament 409
      5. V Allegations of violations and prior programmes and activities 415
      6. VI Prevention, response and remediation 417
      7. VII Conclusions 424
    • 11. Conventional arms control 425zdzislaw lachowski
      1. I Introduction 425
      2. II European arms control 425
      3. III Building military security cooperation in the OSCE area 436
      4. IV Control of inhumane weapons 442
      5. V Conclusions 445
      6. Table 11.1. Aggregate treaty-limited equipment holdings of the states parties to the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe, as of 1 January 2010 426
    • 12. Controls on security-related international transfers 447sibylle bauer and ivana mićić
      1. I Introduction 447
      2. II United Nations Security Council resolutions on transfers of proliferation-sensitive items 448
      3. III Developments in multilateral export control regimes 451
      4. IV Supply-side and cooperative measures in the European Union 461
      5. V Conclusions 466
      6. Table 12.1. Participation in multilateral weapon and technology transfer control regimes, as of 1 January 2010 450
    • Appendix 12A. Multilateral arms embargoes, 2009 467pieter d. wezeman and noel kelly
      1. I Introduction 467
      2. II Developments in United Nations arms embargoes 467
      3. III Developments in other multilateral arms embargoes 470
      4. Table 12A.1. Multilateral arms embargoes in force during 2009 472
    • Annexes
    • Annex A. Arms control and disarmament agreements 477nenne bodell
      1. I Universal treaties 478
      2. II Regional treaties 494
      3. III Bilateral treaties 504
    • Annex B. International security cooperation bodies 507nenne bodell
    • Annex C. Chronology 2009 527nenne bodell

Citation (MLA):
"." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 29 Apr. 2017. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-miscMatter-5.xml>.
Citation (APA):
(2016). . In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 29 Apr. 2017, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-miscMatter-5.xml
Citation (Chicago):
"." In SIPRI Yearbook 2010: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 29 Apr. 2017, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199581122/sipri-9780199581122-miscMatter-5.xml
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