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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2012

SIPRI Yearbook 2012

III. Libya and its aftermath: the limits of intervention?

Chapter:
1. Responding to atrocities: the new geopolitics of intervention
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2012
Author(s):
Gareth Evans

Libya in 2011 was, at least initially, a textbook example of how R2P is supposed to work in the face of a rapidly unfolding mass atrocity situation during which early-stage prevention measures no longer have any relevance. In February, Gaddafi’s forces responded to the initial peaceful protests against the excesses of his regime, inspired by the Arab Spring revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, by massacring at least several hundred of his own people.36 That led to UN Security Council Resolution 1970, which specifically invoked ‘the Libyan authorities’ responsibility to protect its population’, condemned its violence against civilians, demanded that this stop and sought to concentrate Gaddafi’s mind by applying targeted sanctions, an arms embargo and the threat of ICC prosecution for crimes against humanity.37

Citation (MLA):
Evans, Gareth. "1. Responding to atrocities: the new geopolitics of intervention." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199650583/sipri-9780199650583-div1-9.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Evans, G. (2016). 1. Responding to atrocities: the new geopolitics of intervention. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2012: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199650583/sipri-9780199650583-div1-9.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Evans, Gareth. "1. Responding to atrocities: the new geopolitics of intervention." In SIPRI Yearbook 2012: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199650583/sipri-9780199650583-div1-9.xml
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