We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2013

SIPRI Yearbook 2013

III. Russian military expenditure, reform and restructuring

Chapter:
3. Military expenditure
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2013
Author(s):
Sam Perlo-Freeman

The rising trend in Russia's military expenditure, which started in 1999, accelerated sharply in 2012, with a real-terms increase of 16 per cent compared with 2011. The draft budget for 2013–15 contains plans for a further rise in nominal terms of just over 40 per cent by 2015 (see table 3.5).1 This would amount to a real-terms increase of approximately 17 per cent between 2012 and 2015, based on current inflation projections, and military spending as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) would rise to 4.8 per cent.2 The increases come as Russia implements the ambitious 2011–20 State Armaments Programme (Gosudarstvennaya Programma Vooruzheniya, GPV), and undertakes a wide-ranging reform of its armed forces. This section summarizes the reforms and discusses widespread doubts as to how far they can be implemented.

Citation (MLA):
Perlo-Freeman, Sam. "3. Military expenditure." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 15 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-20.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Perlo-Freeman, S. (2016). 3. Military expenditure. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2013: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-20.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Perlo-Freeman, Sam. "3. Military expenditure." In SIPRI Yearbook 2013: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-20.xml
The SIPRI Yearbook online requires a subscription or purchase to access its full text (purchase of a print copy of the 2010-2016 yearbooks also provides access to some content). Unsubscribed users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.
Please log in to access full text content, or find out more about how to subscribe.
If you think you should have access to this service, please contact your librarian.