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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2013

SIPRI Yearbook 2013

III. The consequences of violent conflict and insecurity

Chapter:
Introduction
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2013
Author(s):
Tilman Brück

Group-based violent conflict can be viewed as a systematic challenge to a state's right and ability to define and enforce its citizens’ property rights. Violent conflict aims to re-order a country's institutions, where ‘institution’ is broadly defined to include both formal structures and informal rules and norms. For example, rebels in the Basque country in Spain started a war of secession to dispute the right of the Spanish Government to enforce its sovereignty. Such a dispute may be about languages used in schools or about how the police are organized, but it may also be about the identity of a region and its inhabitants—that is, about informal traditions, which may have no direct legal or economic implications.21 Some agents of violent conflict, the ‘human drivers of insecurity’, such as terrorist groups, may wish to weaken central state institutions directly. Others, such as organized criminal groups, which need a docile state that tolerates or at least ineffectively pursues the criminals, may wish to weaken the central state as a means to an end.22

Citation (MLA):
Brück, Tilman. "Introduction." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 15 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-4.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Brück, T. (2016). Introduction. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2013: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-4.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Brück, Tilman. "Introduction." In SIPRI Yearbook 2013: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-4.xml
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