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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2013

SIPRI Yearbook 2013

III. Chemical and biological weapon programmes

Chapter:
8. Reducing security threats from chemical and biological materials
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2013
Author(s):
John Hart

Allegations of chemical and biological weapon programmes and use continued in 2012 with little official or otherwise authoritative reporting to clarify them. Many of these allegations concerned suspected Syrian chemical weapon stockpiles and fears that such stocks would be used in that country's civil war. In addition, new information emerged on the methods used by the Japanese cult Aum Shinrikyo in its 1995 sarin attack on the Tokyo underground, and a definitive account of the Soviet biological weapon programme was published.

Citation (MLA):
Hart, John. "8. Reducing security threats from chemical and biological materials." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 15 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-54.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Hart, J. (2016). 8. Reducing security threats from chemical and biological materials. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2013: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-54.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Hart, John. "8. Reducing security threats from chemical and biological materials." In SIPRI Yearbook 2013: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199678433/sipri-9780199678433-div1-54.xml
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