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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

II. Current thinking on resource–conflict links

Chapter:
2. Resources and armed conflict
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2011
Author(s):
Neil Melvin, Ruben de Koning

Competition over natural resources has historically been seen as a legitimate justification for going to war, while the redistribution of resources—notably territory—in favour of the victors was frequently integral to the settlement of conflict. However, with the rise of ‘political wars’—conflicts in which competing political ideologies (such as fascism, communism and liberal democracy) apparently provided the prime motivation for war, most starkly illustrated by World War II and the cold war—resources were relegated to a minor consideration in conflict discourse.

Citation (MLA):
Melvin, Neil, and Ruben de Koning. "2. Resources and armed conflict." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-11.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Melvin, N., & de Koning, R. (2016). 2. Resources and armed conflict. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-11.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Melvin, Neil, and Ruben de Koning. "2. Resources and armed conflict." In SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-11.xml
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