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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

III. Economic approaches to conflict

Chapter:
2. Resources and armed conflict
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2011
Author(s):
Neil Melvin, Ruben de Koning

During the late 1990s research into the structural causes of ongoing intrastate conflicts and the motivations of combatants increasingly explored the role of economics. A seminal 1998 book provided an alternative to the prevailing representation of civil wars as simple confrontations between two sides or explosions of mindless violence motivated by ethnic or religious differences or other grievances. Instead, it maintained that armed conflict can also create a ‘new system of profits and power’.9 These observations were based mainly on case studies of the roles played by diamonds in conflicts in Angola, Liberia and Sierra Leone; by narcotics in conflicts in Afghanistan and Colombia; and by various minerals in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Citation (MLA):
Melvin, Neil, and Ruben de Koning. "2. Resources and armed conflict." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-12.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Melvin, N., & de Koning, R. (2016). 2. Resources and armed conflict. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-12.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Melvin, Neil, and Ruben de Koning. "2. Resources and armed conflict." In SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-12.xml
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