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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

II. Highlights and changes

Chapter:
2. Resources and armed conflict
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2011
Author(s):
Camilla Schippa, Daniel Hyslop

In the Global Peace Index 2011 Iceland is ranked as the country most at peace, replacing New Zealand. Iceland topped the GPI in 2008, but dropped to fourth place in 2009 amid the country’s unprecedented economic collapse and political crisis, which saw an increase in the number of police and security officers and an increase in the incarceration rate. This year Iceland has regained first place due to restored stability in the country’s political scene and a drop in its level of military capability and sophistication, as austerity measures led to reductions in the already small military budget. Small, stable and democratic countries are consistently ranked highest; 14 of the top 20 countries are in Western or Central Europe. This is, however, a reduction from 15 in 2010, and

Table 2B.2. Countries with the greatest change in Global Peace Index scores, 2010–11

Country

Score, 2011

Change in score, 2010–11

Rank, 2011

Change in rank, 2010–11a

Top 5 risers

Georgia

2.558

–0.412

134

+12

Chad

2.740

–0.224

141

+4

Mongolia

1.880

–0.221

57

+36

Sri Lanka

2.407

–0.215

126

+11

Thailand

2.247

–0.147

107

+19

Top 5 fallers

Libya

2.816

+0.977

143

–83

Bahrain

2.398

+0.429

123

–47

Egypt

2.023

+0.239

73

–25

North Korea

3.092

+0.236

149

–6

Madagascar

2.239

+0.220

105

–26

(a) The Global Peace Index (GPI) 2010 included only 149 countries while the 2011 GPI includes 153 countries, which affects changes in ranking between 2010 and 2011.

is due to both a deterioration in Slovakia’s score and an improvement in Malaysia’s, which is in the top 20 for the first time.

Citation (MLA):
Schippa, Camilla, and Daniel Hyslop. "2. Resources and armed conflict." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 15 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-22.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Schippa, C., & Hyslop, D. (2016). 2. Resources and armed conflict. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-22.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Schippa, Camilla, and Daniel Hyslop. "2. Resources and armed conflict." In SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-div1-22.xml
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