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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

About the authors

Chapter:
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2011

  • Sigrún Andrésdóttir (Iceland) is a Research Assistant with the SIPRI Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme. She manages the SIPRI Multilateral Peace Operations Database. She previously worked for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in Afghanistan and for the Icelandic Embassy and Permanent Mission in Vienna.

  • Dr Sibylle Bauer (Germany) is Senior Researcher and Head of the SIPRI Export Control Project of the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. Previously, she was a Researcher with the Institute for European Studies in Brussels. Since 2005, she has designed and implemented capacity-building activities in Europe and, more recently also South East Asia, with a focus on legal and enforcement issues related to the enhancement of transit, brokering and export controls. Her publications include The European Union Code of Conduct on Arms Exports: Improving the Annual Report, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 8 (2004, co-author), chapters in The Arms Trade (Routledge, 2010) and From Early Warning To Early Action? The Debate on the Enhancement of the EU’s Crisis Response Capability Continues (European Commission, 2008, co-author). She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2004.

  • Nenne Bodell (Sweden) is Director of the SIPRI Library and Documentation Department and of the SIPRI Arms Control and Disarmament Documentary Survey Programme. She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2003.

  • Vincent Boulanin (France) has been a Visiting Research Fellow at SIPRI since 2008, working with the SIPRI Arms Production Programme. He is currently pursuing a PhD in political studies at l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), Paris, looking at the development of the European defence industry in the realm of security. He has also conducted research and published on the Swedish defence industry and Swedish defence policy.

  • Mark Bromley (United Kingdom) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme, where his work focuses on European arms exports and export controls and South American arms acquisitions. Previously, he was a policy analyst for the British American Security Information Council (BASIC). His publications include ‘The Europeanisation of arms export policy in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Poland’, European Security (June 2007), The Impact on Domestic Policy of the EU Code of Conduct on Arms Exports: The Czech Republic, the Netherlands and Spain, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 21 (May 2008), and Air Transport and Destabilizing Commodity Flows, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 24 (May 2009, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2004.

  • Dr Peter Clevestig (Sweden) is Director of the SIPRI Global Health and Security Programme. His research interests include global health and its relation to security and development, the security of biological materials (laboratory biosecurity), biological threats and related policies. He has authored several scientific articles and book chapters on bioterrorism, security aspects of emerging biotechnology and disease surveillance. He is the author of Handbook of Applied Biosecurity for Life Science Laboratories (2009). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2008.

  • Professor Julian Cooper (United Kingdom) is Professor of Russian Economic Studies at the University of Birmingham Centre for Russian and East European Studies. He researches the development of the Russian economy, with particular emphasis on the economics of defence and security. His recent publications include ‘The “security economy”’ in The Politics of Security in Modern Russia (Ashgate, 2010) and ‘The national innovation system of the Russian Federation’ in Encyclopedia of Technology and Innovation Management (Wiley, 2010). He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 1995, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2004 and 2006.

  • Aaron Dunne (United Kingdom) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Programme. Previously, he was Head of Counter-Proliferation of the United Kingdom’s HM Revenue and Customs. He has designed and implemented capacity-building activities in the Middle East and South East Asia, covering a wide spectrum of enforcement issues including strategic trade controls, risk management, legislative reviews and case studies. Prior to his work on strategic trade controls, he researched, taught and published on Iranian politico-military affairs and domestic politics.

  • Vitaly Fedchenko (Russia) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme, with responsibility for nuclear security issues and the political, technological and educational dimensions of nuclear arms control and non-proliferation. Previously, he was a visiting researcher at SIPRI and worked at the Center for Policy Studies in Russia and the Institute for Applied International Research in Moscow. He is the author or co-author of several publications on nuclear forensics, nuclear security and verification, and the international nuclear fuel cycle, including Reforming Nuclear Export Controls: The Future of the Nuclear Suppliers Group, SIPRI Research Report no. 22 (2007, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2005.

  • Andrew Feinstein (United Kingdom/South Africa) is a former ANC member of the South African Parliament. He resigned when prevented from investigating corruption in the South African arms deal, on which he published the best-selling book After the Party (Jonathan Ball, 2007). His next book, The Shadow World: Inside the Global Arms Trade (Hamish Hamilton/Farrar, Straus and Giroux) will be published in November 2011. His writing has been published in The Guardian, The Telegraph, New Statesman, Prospect, Der Spiegel and numerous South African publications. He appears regularly on the BBC, Sky, CNN and Al Jazeera. He was an Open Society Fellow in 2010–11 and is the founding co-Director of Corruption Watch, a UK-based non-governmental organization.

  • Dr Bates Gill (United States) is the seventh Director of SIPRI. Before joining SIPRI in October 2007, he held the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, DC. He previously served as a Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies and inaugural Director of the Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution. He has a long record of research and publication on international and regional security issues, particularly regarding arms control, non-proliferation, strategic nuclear relations, peacekeeping and military–technical development, especially with regard to China and Asia. His most recent publications include Governing the Bomb: Civilian Control and Democratic Accountability of Nuclear Weapons (2010, co-editor), Asia’s New Multilateralism: Cooperation, Competition, and the Search for Community (Columbia University Press, 2009, co-editor) and Rising Star: China’s New Security Diplomacy (Brookings, 2007).

  • Dr Alexander Glaser (Germany) is Assistant Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. He is a participant in the university’s Program on Science and Global Security and works with the International Panel on Fissile Materials, which publishes the annual Global Fissile Material Report. Between 2001 and 2003 he was an SSRC/MacArthur Fellow with the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During 2000 and 2001 he was an adviser to the German Federal Ministry of Environment and Reactor Safety. He is associate editor of Science & Global Security. He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2007.

  • Dr Bharath Gopalaswamy (India) is a visiting scholar at the Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict studies at Cornell University. Prior to that he was a Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. He has worked at the Indian Space Research Organisation’s High-Altitude Test Facilities and for EADS Astrium and was a postdoctoral associate at Cornell University’s Peace Studies Program, where he worked on the technical aspects of foreign policy issues. He has a PhD in mechanical engineering with a specialization in numerical acoustics.

  • John Hart (United States) is a Senior Researcher and Head of the Chemical and Biological Security Project of the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. He is also a doctoral candidate in military sciences at the Finnish National Defence University. His publications include Chemical Weapon Destruction in Russia: Political, Legal and Technical Aspects (1998, co-editor) and Historical Dictionary of Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Warfare (Scarecrow Press, 2007, co-author). His recent publications include a chapter on WMD inspection and verification regimes in Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Future of International Non-Proliferation Policy (University of Georgia Press, 2009, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 1997, 1998 and since 2002.

  • Paul Holden (United Kingdom/South Africa) is a South African historian and writer focusing on corruption and governance issues. He has published two books to date, including a critically acclaimed history of the South African arms deal, The Arms Deal in Your Pocket (Jonathan Ball, 2008). A follow-up study of the arms deal, The Devil in the Detail, is due for publication in 2011.

  • Dr Paul Holtom (United Kingdom) is Director of the SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme. Previously, he was a Research Fellow with the University of Glamorgan Centre for Border Studies. His most recent publications include ‘Nothing to report: the lost promise of the UN Register of Conventional Arms’, Contemporary Security Policy (April 2010), ‘The international arms trade: difficult to define, measure, and control’, Arms Control Today (July/Aug. 2010, co-author) and ‘The limitations of European Union reports on arms exports: the case of Central Asia’, SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security no. 2010/5 (Sep. 2010, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2007.

  • Daniel Hyslop (Australia) is Research Manager at the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP). His role is to commission, direct and manage research for the IEP as well as author and oversee publication of periodical materials. Prior to joining the IEP, he worked in a political consultancy firm, the Australian Public Service, and was a research fellow at Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management.

  • Dr Olawale Ismail (Nigeria) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme and coordinator of the SIPRI Project on Security, Democratization and Good Governance in Africa. He holds a PhD in peace studies from the University of Bradford. He previously worked with the Conflict, Security and Development Group (CSDG), King’s College London, and for the SIPRI Project on Budgeting for the Military Sector in Africa. His recent publications include Post-War Regimes and State Reconstruction in Liberia and Sierra Leone (CODESRIA, 2009, co-author), Dynamics of Post-conflict Reconstruction and Peace Building in West Africa: Between Change and Security (Nordic Africa Institute, 2009) and ‘The dialectics of “junctions” and “bases”: youth, “securo-commerce” and the crises of order in downtown Lagos’, Security Dialogue (2009).

  • Dr Susan T. Jackson (United States) is Head of the Arms Production Project of the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme. She holds a PhD from the University of Arizona on the linkages between state and corporate global competitiveness and military spending. She has published and presented on militarization and the national security exception. She lived in Turkey for more than three years, where her work included editing and translating for a daily economic and political news digest for business executives.

  • Noel Kelly (Ireland) is a Research Assistant with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production and Arms Transfers programmes. He is responsible for the electronic archive common to these three research areas and maintains the SIPRI reporting system for military expenditure. He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2009.

  • Shannon N. Kile (USA) is a Senior Researcher and Head of the Nuclear Weapons Project of the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. His principal areas of research are nuclear arms control and non-proliferation with a special interest in Iran and North Korea. He has contributed to numerous SIPRI publications, including chapters on nuclear arms control and nuclear forces and weapon technology for the SIPRI Yearbook since 1995. His recent publications include, as editor, Europe and Iran: Perspectives on Non-proliferation, SIPRI Research Report no. 21 (2005).

  • Ruben de Koning (Netherlands) is a member of the United Nations Group of Experts on the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Until early 2011 he was a Researcher with the SIPRI Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme. His recent publications include ‘Demilitarizing mining areas in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: the case of northern Katanga province’, SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security no. 2008/2 (Oct. 2008) and ‘Resource–conflict links in Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of the Congo’, SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security no. 2010/1 (Jan. 2010).

  • Hans M. Kristensen (Denmark) is Director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists (FAS). He is a frequent consultant to the news media and institutes on nuclear weapon matters and is co-author of the ‘Nuclear notebook’ column in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. His recent publications include Obama and the Nuclear War Plan (FAS, 2010). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2001.

  • Dr Zdzislaw Lachowski (Poland) is Deputy Head of the Polish National Security Bureau. Until 2010 he was a Senior Fellow with the SIPRI Euro-Atlantic Security Programme. His research interests include the problems of European military security and arms control as well as European politico-military integration. He is the co-editor of International Security in a Time of Change: Threats–Concepts–Institutions (Nomos, 2004), author of Confidence- and Security-Building Measures in the New Europe, SIPRI Research Report no. 18 (2004) and Foreign Military Bases in Eurasia, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 18 (2007), and lead author of Tools for Building Confidence on the Korean Peninsula (2007). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1992.

  • Dr Neil Melvin (United Kingdom) is Director of the SIPRI Armed Conflict and Conflict Management Programme. Prior to joining SIPRI he held senior adviser positions in the Energy Charter Secretariat and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE). He has also worked at a variety of leading policy institutes in Europe and has published widely on issues of conflict, with a particular focus on ethno-religious issues. In recent years he has broadened his research interests to consider the impact of resources on conflict, notably the issue of energy and conflict.

  • Zia Mian (Pakistan/United Kingdom) is a physicist with Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, where he directs the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia. For the past decade his work has focused on nuclear weapons, arms control and disarmament, and nuclear energy issues in Pakistan and India. He has previously worked at the Union of Concerned Scientists, the Sustainable Development Policy Institute and Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad. He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2003 and since 2007.

  • Ivana Mićić (Belgium) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Control and Non-proliferation Programme. In addition to research work on trade controls and non-proliferation issues, she designs and implements a range of capacity-building activities—at the regional and national levels—to strengthen trade control systems in South Eastern Europe. She has recently started working on related issues in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2008–2009 she worked on the implementation of SIPRI’s project on strengthening capacities to investigate and prosecute trade control violations in South Eastern Europe. Prior to joining SIPRI she undertook research on security sector reform focusing on South East European border controls. She contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2010.

  • Barnaby Pace (United Kingdom) is a freelance researcher and activist specializing in the arms trade and corruption.

  • Dr Sam Perlo-Freeman (United Kingdom) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme, responsible for monitoring data on military expenditure worldwide. Previously, he was a Senior Lecturer at the University of the West of England, working in the field of defence and peace economics. His recent publications include ‘The demand for military expenditure in developing countries: hostility vs capability’, Defence and Peace Economics (August 2008, co-author), and a chapter on the UK’s arms industry in The Global Arms Trade: A Handbook (Routledge, 2009). He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009 and 2010.

  • Camilla Schippa (Italy) is a Director of the Institute for Economics and Peace, where she manages the development of the Global Peace Index as well as the research carried out internationally on and around the index. Until early 2008 she was chief of office of the United Nations Office for Partnerships, where she guided the creation of strategic alliances between the UN and corporations, foundations and philanthropists.

  • Dr Elisabeth Sköns (Sweden) is Director of the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme. Her current research focus is on the security-related activities of external actors in Africa and she leads the SIPRI Project on Security, Democratization and Good Governance in Africa. Her recent publications include ‘The private military services industry’, SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security no. 2008/1 (Sep. 2008, co-author), ‘The economics of arms production’ in Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace and Conflict (Elsevier, 2008, co-author), ‘The military-industrial complex’ in The Global Arms Trade (Routledge, 2010, co-author) and ‘The US defence industry after the cold war’ in The Global Arms Trade (Routledge 2010). She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1983.

  • Carina Solmirano (Argentina) is a Researcher with the SIPRI Military Expenditure and Arms Production Programme responsible for monitoring military expenditure in Latin America, the Middle East and South Asia. Prior to joining SIPRI, she worked at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, Colorado, where she is a doctoral candidate. She has also worked on arms control issues at the Argentine NGO Asociacion para Politicas Publicas and as an adviser at the Argentine Senate.

  • Dr Thierry Tardy (France) is a faculty member of the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP). Previously, he was a researcher at the Fondation pour la recherche stratégique (FRS, Foundation for Strategic Research), Paris, and lecturer at the Institut d’Études Politiques (Institute of Political Studies) and at the French War College. His book publications include Gestion de crise, maintien et consolidation de la paix. Acteurs, activités, défis [Crisis management, peacekeeping and peacebuilding: actors, activities, challenges] (De Boeck, 2009), European Security in a Global Context: Internal and External Dynamics (Routledge/GCSP, 2009, editor), and Peace Operations after 11 September 2001 (Routledge, 2004, editor).

  • Lotta Themnér (Sweden) is a Research Coordinator with the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP) at the Uppsala University Department of Peace and Conflict Research. She has edited seven volumes of the UCDP’s States in Armed Conflict and has co-authored a number of articles and book chapters on armed conflicts. She has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 2005.

  • Professor Peter Wallensteen (Sweden) has held the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University since 1985 and has been the Richard G. Starmann Sr Research Professor of Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame since 2006. He directs the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP) and the Special Program on the Implementation of Targeted Sanctions (SPITS). His publications include Understanding Conflict Resolution: War, Peace and the Global System (Sage, 3rd edn, forthcoming 2011) and The Go-Between: Jan Eliasson and the Styles of Mediation (US Institute of Peace Press, 2010, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1988.

  • Pieter D. Wezeman (Netherlands) is a Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme. He rejoined SIPRI in 2006, having previously worked at the institute from 1994 to 2003. From 2003 to 2006 he was a Senior Analyst for the Dutch Ministry of Defence in the field of proliferation of conventional and nuclear weapon technology. He contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook in 1995–2003 and since 2007.

  • Siemon T. Wezeman (Netherlands) is a Senior Fellow with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme, where he has worked since 1992. Among his publications are several relating to international transparency in arms transfers, The Future of the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms, SIPRI Policy Paper no. 4 (August 2003), and Cluster Weapons: Necessity or Convenience? (Pax Christi Netherlands, 2005, co-author). He has contributed to the SIPRI Yearbook since 1993.

Citation (MLA):
"." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-miscMatter-10.xml>.
Citation (APA):
(2016). . In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-miscMatter-10.xml
Citation (Chicago):
"." In SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 18 Dec. 2018, from http://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-miscMatter-10.xml
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