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Type: section

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198712596.002.0008.021.0003

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Contact informationCustomers within the AmericasEmail:oxfordonline@oup.comTelephone: +1 (800) 624 0153Fax: +1 (919) 677 8877Customers outside the AmericasEmail:institutionalsales@oup.comTelephone: +44 (0) 1865 353705Fax: +44 (0) 1865 353308

12. Controls on security-related international transfers »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0013

Chapter: 12. Controls on security-related international transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Sibylle Bauer, Ivana Micic

SibylleBauerIvanaMicicNon-proliferation efforts have shifted focus from physical movement of goods to analysis of the elements of a transaction that should be subject to control. The main export control forums attempt to effectively control exports of items that may be used in nuclear, biological and chemical weapons and in their missile delivery systems. They also discuss intangible transfers of technology, enforcement, good practices and engagement with non-participating states. The EU has increased cooperation with non-EU countries through technical assistance programmes. In 2009 it adopted a strengthened regulation to control transit and brokering of dual-use items that may

10. Conventional arms control »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199650583.003.0011

Chapter: 10. Conventional arms control

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2012

Author: Lina Grip, Mark Bromley, Glenn Mcdonald, Pieter D. Wezeman, Noel Kelly, Hans-Joachim Schmidt, Wolfgang Zellner

LinaGripMarkBromleyGlennMcdonaldPieter D.WezemanNoelKellyHans-JoachimSchmidtWolfgangZellner10. Conventional arms controlOverviewWhile states are continuously concerned with whether or not their national military potential is properly matched to vulnerabilities (actual or perceived), they have also been willing to discuss restraints on military capabilities with one another. With the exception of some promising progress in South America and in South Eastern Europe, in 2011 most developments in conventional arms control were discouraging as states were not willing to modify national positions in order to facilitate agreement, either globally or regionally.Three

11. Conventional arms control »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0012

Chapter: 11. Conventional arms control

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Zdzislaw Lachowski

ZdzislawLachowskiEndeavours to rejuvenate European conventional arms control intensified in 2009. The European security dialogue continued stressing the need to revitalize arms control and military confidence and security building. The proposal by Russia for a European security treaty gave hope for progress. The 1990 Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe, however, has remained in abeyance since December 2007. Further steps were taken to make the Western Balkans subregional arms control framework more self-reliant. Efforts to control so-called inhumane weapons continued in 2009, although with less dynamism than demonstrated in 2008 by the ‘Oslo process’ on cluster munitions.11.

14. Conventional arms control »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198811800.003.0014

Chapter: 14. Conventional arms control

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2017

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20170607.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen14. Conventional arms controlOverviewThe Geneva Conventions are an international benchmark for behaviour during armed conflict. In 2011 the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) initiated a multi-year project to update a series of commentaries that provide guidance to states on how to interpret and implement the conventions. The first update is on the Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Wounded and Sick in Armed Forces in the Field, and is part of a series of commentaries that will consider changes

9. Conventional arms control »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.003.0009

Chapter: 9. Conventional arms control

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

Author: Dan Smith

OxChapML2.50OUP TCI20180606.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen9. Conventional arms controlOverviewThe regulation of different categories of weapons as a means of trying to improve compliance with international humanitarian law has become an important theme in conventional arms control. However, participation in humanitarian arms control agreements is far from universal and states parties to such agreements still face many implementation challenges. According to some states and civil society groups, there are also gaps in humanitarian arms control and disarmament law that need to be addressed. In 2017, negotiations to address some of these challenges

10. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.003.0011

Chapter: 10. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Zdzislaw Lachowski

ZdzislawLachowski*In 2010 improved relations between Russia and the United States, the signing of the New START treaty and efforts to surmount obstacles on the European security agenda ‘reset’ conventional arms control and confidence- and security-building measures (CSBMs). Proposals made in 2010 on the two tracks of European arms control dialogue, the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe regime and the Vienna Document on CSBMs, will inform future work. Arms control in Europe depends on the strategic interests of its main actors. Elsewhere, the relevance of the Treaty on Open Skies was reaffirmed at its second review

9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199678433.003.0010

Chapter: 9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2013

Author: Ian Anthony

IanAnthonyAbstract and keywords to be supplied9. Conventional arms control and military confidence buildingOverviewIn 2012 openness and restraint to provide reassurance that military capabilities will not be used for political gain—which is a broad definition of confidence- and security-building measures (CSBMs)—made a valuable contribution to reducing tensions and preventing the escalation of incidents in several regions of the world. As well as playing their part to prevent specific incidents from escalating into something worse, CSBMs are being developed more broadly in several regions as a positive tool to enhance cooperative relations among states based on

9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

Chapter: 9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Author: Ian Anthony

OverviewArms control has been continuously adapted in response to changes in the security environment, including the need to regulate and restrain the behaviour of non-state actors and the emergence of new technologies. The scope of application of legal-restraint measures now reaches far beyond the items that would traditionally be defined as arms. Likewise, the various existent and emerging frameworks of restraint are not limited to treaties and conventions. New innovations include, for example, politically binding confidence-building measures (CBMs) that are intended to promote the responsible use of information and communications technologies, and a shared ethical code intended to guide

9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198712596.003.0010

Chapter: 9. Conventional arms control and military confidence building

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Author: Ian Anthony, Lina Grip, Chris Holland

IanAnthonyLinaGripChrisHollandOxChapML2.27OUP TCI20140403.0Medicine-USSIPRI Yearbook Series9. Conventional arms control and military confidence buildingOverviewArms control has been continuously adapted in response to changes in the security environment, including the need to regulate and restrain the behaviour of non-state actors and the emergence of new technologies. The scope of application of legal-restraint measures now reaches far beyond the items that would traditionally be defined as arms. Likewise, the various existent and emerging frameworks of restraint are not limited to treaties and conventions. New innovations include, for example, politically binding