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Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2000–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0001

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Lotta Harbom, Peter Wallensteen

LottaHarbomPeterWallensteen*Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2000–2009I. Global patterns in major armed conflictsIn 2009, 17 major armed conflicts were active in 16 locations around the world (seetables2A.1 and2A.2). During the past decade, 30 major armed conflicts have been active in 29 locations worldwide.1 There has been a slight overall reduction in the number of major armed conflicts over the past decade, but the trend has been uneven (seefigure2A.1). Starting at 19 in 2000, the number declined steadily until 2004, when

Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2001–10 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0001

Chapter: 2. Resources and armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Lotta Themnér, Peter Wallensteen

LottaThemnérPeterWallensteen*Appendix 2A. Patterns of major armed conflicts, 2001–10I. Global patternsIn 2010, 15 major armed conflicts were active in 15 locations worldwide (seetables 2A.1 and2A.2). During the 10-year period 2001–10, 29 major armed conflicts were active in 28 locations (seefigure 2A.1).1 The annual number of active major armed conflicts fell over the period, from 19 in 2001. However, the decline was uneven and the lowest number, 14, is recorded for 2004 and 2007 (seefigure 2A.2).2For the seventh consecutive year, no

Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2010 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0002

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Tim Macintyre, Camilla Schippa

TimMacintyreCamillaSchippa*Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2010I. IntroductionThe concept of peace is notoriously difficult to define. The simplest way of approaching it is in terms of harmony achieved by the absence of war or conflict. Applied to states, this would suggest that those not involved in wars with neighbouring states or suffering internal violent conflicts have achieved a state of peace. This is what Johan Galtung defined as ‘negative peace’ —an absence of violence.1 The concept of negative peace is immediately intuitive and empirically measurable and can be used

Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2011 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0002

Chapter: 2. Resources and armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Camilla Schippa, Daniel Hyslop

CamillaSchippaDanielHyslop*Appendix 2B. The Global Peace Index 2011I. IntroductionNow in its fifth year, the Global Peace Index (GPI), produced by the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP), is a measurement of the peacefulness of countries based on a scoring model that uses 23 indicators to rank 153 countries by their relative states of peace. The indicators have been selected as being the best available data sets that reflect the incidence or absence of peace. They contain both quantitative data and qualitative scores from a range of trusted sources.The GPI’s principal aim

Appendix 3A. Multilateral peace operations, 2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0003

Chapter: 3. Civilian roles in peace operations

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Kirsten Soder, Krister Karlsson

KirstenSoderKristerKarlssonAppendix 3A. Multilateral peace operations, 2009I. IntroductionThis appendix describes developments in peace operations in 2009 and draws on data collected in the SIPRI Multilateral Peace Operations Database to analyse trends in peace operations in the 10-year period 2000–2009.1 The data presented here is a year-end snapshot for ongoing peace operations in 2009 and is meant to serve as a reference point to enable comparative analysis between 2009 and previous years.2 Global trends are presented in section II and regional trends in section III. The sources and methods used

Appendix 3A. Multilateral peace operations, 2010 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0003

Chapter: 3. Peace operations: the fragile consensus

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Sigrún Andrésdóttir

SigrúnAndrésdóttirAppendix 3A. Multilateral peace operations, 2010I. IntroductionThis appendix describes developments in peace operations in 2010 and draws on data collected in the SIPRI Multilateral Peace Operations Database to analyse trends in peace operations in the 10-year period 2001–10.1 The data presented here is a snapshot of ongoing peace operations in 2010 and is meant to serve as a reference point to enable comparative analysis between 2010 and previous years.2 Global trends are presented insection II and regional developments insection III. The sources and methods used when

Appendix 4A. Military expenditure data, 2001–10 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0004

Chapter: 4. Military expenditure

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Sam Perlo-freeman, Olawale Ismail, Noel Kelly, Elisabeth Sköns, Carina Solmirano

SamPerlo-freemanOlawaleIsmailNoelKellyElisabethSkönsCarinaSolmirano*Appendix 4A. Military expenditure data, 2001–10I. IntroductionThis appendix presents the latest SIPRI military expenditure data for the years 2001–10. The principal regional trends and trends among major spenders are described insection II.Section III discusses how China’s military spending can best be estimated.Section IV explains the sources and methods used in compiling the data and contains tables with the complete data series for 2001–10.II. Regional trends and major spendersIII. Estimating China’s military spendingIV. Tables of military expenditure

Appendix 4B. The reporting of military expenditure data, 2001–10 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0005

Chapter: 4. Military expenditure

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Noel Kelly

NoelKellyAppendix 4B. The reporting of military expenditure data, 2001–10I. IntroductionThe public availability of information on military expenditure has increased in recent years. In many countries this increase in transparency has been partly associated with an increase in democratic governance and civilian control of the military. Another factor has been the growth of the Internet; a growing number of governments make budgetary information, including military budgets, available online. However, national systems of reporting vary considerably in the level of coverage, the definitions of military spending and the level of disaggregation.This appendix focuses on the

Appendix 5A. Military expenditure data, 2000–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0004

Chapter: 5. Military expenditure

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Sam Perlo-freeman, Olawale Ismail, Noel Kelly, Carina Solmirano

SamPerlo-freemanOlawaleIsmailNoelKellyCarinaSolmirano*Appendix 5A. Military expenditure data, 2000–2009I. IntroductionThis appendix presents the latest SIPRI military expenditure data for the years 2000–2009. The principal regional trends and trends among major spenders are described in section II, along with a discussion of how China’s military spending can best be estimated. Section III explains SIPRI’s sources and methods, and contains tables with the complete data series for 2000–2009.II. Regional trends and major spendersIII. Tables of military expenditure* Contribution of military expenditure data, estimates and advice are

Appendix 5A. The SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies, 2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0006

Chapter: 5. Arms production

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Susan T. Jackson

Susan T.Jackson*Appendix 5A. The SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies, 2009I. IntroductionThe SIPRI Top 100 lists the world’s 100 largest arms-producing companies (excluding those based in China), ranked by their arms sales. It is a unique data set that allows analysis of developments in worldwide arms production in terms of major arms-producing companies and their adjustments to political and economic contexts and the resulting industrial structures.Section II of this appendix discusses the main trends revealed by the Top 100 for 2009.Section III presents the Top 100 itself, including information on