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Appendix 7C. Transparency in arms transfers »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0010

Chapter: 7. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Mark Bromley, Paul Holtom

MarkBromleyPaulHoltomAppendix 7C. Transparency in arms transfersI. IntroductionOfficial and publicly accessible data on arms transfers is important for assessing states’ arms export and arms procurement policies. However, publishing data on arms sales and acquisitions is a sensitive issue for nearly all states. This appendix analyses recent developments in official international, regional and national reporting mechanisms which aim, in whole or in part, to increase the quality and quantity of publicly available information on international arms transfers.Section II describes trends in reporting to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms (UNROCA), while section

Appendix 8A. Global stocks of fissile materials, 2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0011

Chapter: 8. World nuclear forces

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Alexander Glaser, Zia Mian

AlexanderGlaserZiaMian*Appendix 8A. Global stocks of fissile materials, 2009Tables8A.1 and8A.2 detail global stocks of highly enriched uranium and separated plutonium, respectively.Table 8A.1. Global stocks of highly enriched uranium (HEU), 2009National stockpile (tonnes)aProduction statusCommentsChina20 ± 4bStopped 1987–89Francec35 ± 6bStopped early 1996Includes 5.0 tonnes declared civilianIndiad0.6 ± 0.3bContinuingIsraele0.1Pakistan2.1 ± 0.4bContinuingRussiaf770 ± 300bStopped 1987 or 1988Includes 100 tonnes assumed

Appendix 8B. Nuclear explosions, 1945–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0012

Chapter: 8. World nuclear forces

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Vitaly Fedchenko

VitalyFedchenkoAppendix 8B. Nuclear explosions, 1945–2009I. IntroductionIn May 2009 the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, or North Korea) conducted what is widely believed to be a nuclear test explosion. This was North Korea’s second nuclear explosion, following one conducted in October 2006, and brought the total number of nuclear explosions recorded since 1945 to 2054. This appendix describes the available information on the North Korean explosion and then presents up-to-date data on the number of nuclear explosions conducted since 1945.1II. The nuclear test in North KoreaIII. Estimated number of nuclear explosions, 1945–2009

2. Armed conflict »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199650583.003.0003

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2012

Author: Marie Allansson, Jonas Baumann, Samuel Taub, Lotta Themnér, Peter Wallensteen Uppsala Conflict Data Program, Marcus Nilsson, Camilla Schippa, Thomas Morgan Institute for Economics and Peace

MarieAllanssonJonasBaumannSamuelTaubLottaThemnérPeterWallensteen Uppsala Conflict Data ProgramMarcusNilssonCamillaSchippaThomasMorgan Institute for Economics and Peace2. Armed conflictOverviewDuring 2011 the sudden and dramatic popular uprisings in parts of the Middle East and North Africa, which together constituted the Arab Spring, produced diverse patterns of conflict. From the street protests that led to the flight into exile of Tunisia’s president, to the serious armed confrontations that developed in Libya and Syria, the emergence of mass opposition to the region’s ruling regimes was the precursor to dynamic and complex

1. Armed conflict »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199678433.003.0002

Chapter: 1. Armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2013

Author: Neil Melvin

NeilMelvinAbstract and keywords to be supplied1. Armed conflictOverviewIn 2011–12 conflict continued to be a major concern for the international community, most notably in the Middle East, western Asia and Africa, but also with increased levels of interstate tension in East Asia. Nevertheless, deaths resulting from major organized violence worldwide remained at historically low levels.At the same time, the decline in both numbers of conflicts and fatalities that has characterized post-cold war international security has largely levelled off, albeit with spikes in some years (seesectionIIIin this chapter). Indeed, there are

2. Armed conflict »

Type: chapter

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Author: Neil Melvin

OverviewThere has been an overall decline in ‘peacefulness’ in recent years, as measured by the indicators of the Global Peace Index (seesectionIVin this chapter). This has been paralleled by an upward trend in fatalities caused by state-based conflicts (seesectionIII). Some regions of the world, notably the Middle East, have experienced significant rises in the number of battle-related deaths. There has also been a rise in internationalized intrastate conflict. These developments suggest a worrying upward trend in lethal violence related to state-based conflicts.In the post-cold war period, a leading response of the

2. Armed conflict »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198712596.003.0003

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2014

Author: Neil Melvin, Isak Svensson, Magnus Lundgren, Peter Wallensteen, Patrik Johansson, Lotta Themnér, Camilla Schippa, Daniel Hyslop

NeilMelvinIsakSvenssonMagnusLundgrenPeterWallensteenPatrikJohanssonLottaThemnérCamillaSchippaDanielHyslopOxChapML2.27OUP TCI20140403.0Medicine-USSIPRI Yearbook Series2. Armed conflictOverviewThere has been an overall decline in ‘peacefulness’ in recent years, as measured by the indicators of the Global Peace Index (seesectionIVin this chapter). This has been paralleled by an upward trend in fatalities caused by state-based conflicts (seesectionIII). Some regions of the world, notably the Middle East, have experienced significant rises in the number of battle-related deaths. There has also been a rise

4. Armed conflict »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198737810.003.0004

Chapter: 4. Armed conflict

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2015

Author: Peter Wallensteen

PeterWallensteenOxChapML2.27OUP TCI20150902.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen4. Armed conflictOverviewThis chapter reports on recent developments in peace and conflict trends, focusing primarily on data collected through 2013. Based on its preliminary findings, the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP) reported in early 2015 that there were more wars in 2014 than any other year since year 2000. Several other sources subsequently made similar observations: violence increased in 2014. In retrospect, 2014 may stand out as a particularly distressing year. However, there were few, if any, predictive indicators of the violence that unfolded

3. Armed conflict and instability in the Middle East and North Africa »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198811800.003.0003

Chapter: 3. Armed conflict and instability in the Middle East and North Africa

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2017

Author: Ian Davis, Dan Smith, Pieter D. Wezeman

IanDavisDanSmithPieter D.WezemanOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20170607.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen3. Armed conflict and instability in the Middle East and North AfricaOverviewThe Middle East and North Africa (MENA) remained at the heart of global security concerns throughout 2016. A variety of factors explain the region’s seemingly chronic insecurity and persistent susceptibility to armed conflict. These include governance failures in most Arab countries, the still-unfolding consequences of the 2003 invasion of Iraq by the US-led coalition and the complex relations and rivalries among regional powers. In 2016 at least 7

2. Armed conflict and peace processes »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198811800.003.0002

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict and peace processes

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2017

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20170607.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen2. Armed conflict and peace processesOverviewThis chapter reports on recent trends in armed conflict and peace processes. InsectionIthe Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP) provides an overview of the past ten years of active armed conflicts, with a focus on 2016. The number of active armed conflicts decreased from 52 to 49 in 2016. Despite this reduction, 2016 is part of a trend towards a significantly larger number of conflicts in the past three years compared to the period 2007–13. Compared across