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3. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Americas »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780192847577.003.0003

Chapter: 3. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Americas

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2021

Author: Marina Caparini

MarinaCapariniOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20210602.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen3. Armed conflict and peace processes in the AmericasOverviewThe Americas presented a complex and mixed picture for peace during 2020, with worsening conflict in certain countries, but less violence in some, partly as a result of Covid‑19 pandemic lockdowns. In others armed violence continued at a similar level to that in 2019. Two countries—Colombia and Mexico—had several parallel non-international armed conflicts on their territories.Implementation of the 2016 peace accord between the Government of Colombia and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia–People’s Army (Fuerzas

3. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Americas »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780192883032.003.0003

Chapter: 3. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Americas

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2022

Author: Marina Caparini

MarinaCapariniOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20220601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen3. Armed conflict and peace processes in the AmericasOverviewSeveral armed conflicts meeting the non-International armed conflict (NIAC) threshold, as defined under International law, were active in Colombia and Mexico in 2021. In Colombia at least three parallel and overlapping conflicts continued: one between the government and the Ejército de Liberación Nacional (ELN) and another between the government and dissident armed groups of the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia-Ejército del Pueblo (FARC‑EP)’s former Eastern Bloc; and one between rival cartels the ELN and the Autodefensas

6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North Africa »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198869207.003.0006

Chapter: 6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North Africa

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2020

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20200603.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North AfricaOverviewThere were seven countries with active armed conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa in 2019 (the same as in 2018): Egypt (high-intensity, subnational armed conflict), Iraq (internationalized civil war), Israel (low-intensity, extrastate armed conflict), Libya (internationalized civil war), Syria (major internationalized civil war), Turkey (low-intensity, extrastate and subnational armed conflict) and Yemen (major internationalized civil war). All the armed conflicts had fewer fatalities than in 2018, except for Libya. Many

6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North Africa »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780192847577.003.0006

Chapter: 6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North Africa

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2021

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20210602.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North AfricaOverviewThere were seven states with active armed conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in 2020 (the same as in 2017–19): Egypt (low-intensity, subnational armed conflict), Iraq (internationalized civil war), Israel (low-intensity, extrastate armed conflict), Libya (internationalized civil war), Syria (internationalized civil war), Turkey (low-intensity, extrastate and subnational armed conflict) and Yemen (major internationalized civil war). All the armed conflicts had fewer fatalities than in 2019. Overall, conflict-related fatalities have

6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North Africa »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780192883032.003.0006

Chapter: 6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North Africa

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2022

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20220601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North AfricaOverviewThere were eight states with active armed conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in 2021 (the same as in 2020): Egypt, Iraq, Israel (Palestine), Lebanon, Libya, Syria, Turkey and Yemen. Compared with 2020, conflict-related fatalities in 2021 fell in all conflicts apart from Israel–Palestine and Lebanon. Total conflict-related fatalities in the region fell for the fourth consecutive year, down about 75 per cent since 2017. Yemen was the region’s

6. Armed conflict data trends »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.003.0006

Chapter: 6. Armed conflict data trends

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20160601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen6. Armed conflict data trendsOverviewIn recent years there has been a major growth in the availability and validity of data sets on various forms of violence.SectionIreviews the major advances in the collection and availability of data, with a particular focus on the widening of conceptual ambitions, increased precision in the recording of the occurrence of violence and innovations in source-mining techniques. It also discusses major ongoing problems, such as remaining data gaps and issues of data collection.Major questions

2. Armed conflict in the Middle East »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.003.0002

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict in the Middle East

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20160601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen2. Armed conflict in the Middle EastOverviewIn 2015, the Middle East remained a source of major insecurity for many of its countries and inhabitants, and of profound problems and challenges for neighbouring regions, most notably in the form of terrorist attacks in Paris and elsewhere, and the displacement of huge numbers of refugees.The key developments in the year are reviewed briefly insectionI:the intensification of military attacks against Houthi insurgents and their allies in Yemen by a coalition of countries

2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0003

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Ekaterina Stepanova

EkaterinaStepanovaContinuing proliferation of criminal violence in armed conflict settings and the growing links between crime and conflict underscore the need to more actively integrate the study of organized crime and criminal violence into the analysis of organized collective violence. In 2009 this was illustrated by the case of piracy rooted in the weak, conflict-torn state of Somalia and the interaction between the opium economy and conflict in Afghanistan. Even in the absence of classic armed conflict, systemic criminal violence, such as drug-trafficking-related violence in Mexico, may match conflict in scale and intensity and threaten to undermine human security

2. Armed conflicts and peace processes »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.003.0002

Chapter: 2. Armed conflicts and peace processes

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

Author: Dan Smith

OxChapML2.50OUP TCI20180606.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen2. Armed conflicts and peace processesOverviewIn 2017, armed conflicts were active in at least 22 states and many involved multiple non-state armed groups and external actors. Likewise, peace processes are complex and multifaceted, but in 2017 there were few visible examples of successful peacebuilding interventions in the main armed conflicts discussed in this chapter. The resulting human costs fell primarily on civilian populations.In the first 11 months of 2017 the number of civilian deaths caused by explosive weapons was 42 per cent higher than in

5. Arms production »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.003.0006

Chapter: 5. Arms production

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Susan T. Jackson

Susan T.JacksonArms-producing companies displayed resilience, even increasing overall arms sales in 2009, despite the ongoing economic recession. This is true of both companies in North America and Western Europe, which dominate the global arms industry in terms of arms sales, and of companies in some of the smaller economies with advanced arms industries, such as Israel, South Korea and Turkey. Arms sales of the SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies in 2009 reached $401 billion, an increase of $14.8 billion from the previous year. Mega-deal acquisitions returned to the arms industry in 2010.5. Arms productionI.