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6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North Africa »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198869207.003.0006

Chapter: 6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North Africa

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2020

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20200603.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen6. Armed conflict and peace processes in the Middle East and North AfricaOverviewThere were seven countries with active armed conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa in 2019 (the same as in 2018): Egypt (high-intensity, subnational armed conflict), Iraq (internationalized civil war), Israel (low-intensity, extrastate armed conflict), Libya (internationalized civil war), Syria (major internationalized civil war), Turkey (low-intensity, extrastate and subnational armed conflict) and Yemen (major internationalized civil war). All the armed conflicts had fewer fatalities than in 2018, except for Libya. Many

6. Armed conflict data trends »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.003.0006

Chapter: 6. Armed conflict data trends

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20160601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen6. Armed conflict data trendsOverviewIn recent years there has been a major growth in the availability and validity of data sets on various forms of violence.SectionIreviews the major advances in the collection and availability of data, with a particular focus on the widening of conceptual ambitions, increased precision in the recording of the occurrence of violence and innovations in source-mining techniques. It also discusses major ongoing problems, such as remaining data gaps and issues of data collection.Major questions

2. Armed conflict in the Middle East »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.003.0002

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict in the Middle East

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Author: Ian Davis

IanDavisOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20160601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen2. Armed conflict in the Middle EastOverviewIn 2015, the Middle East remained a source of major insecurity for many of its countries and inhabitants, and of profound problems and challenges for neighbouring regions, most notably in the form of terrorist attacks in Paris and elsewhere, and the displacement of huge numbers of refugees.The key developments in the year are reviewed briefly insectionI:the intensification of military attacks against Houthi insurgents and their allies in Yemen by a coalition of countries

2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0003

Chapter: 2. Armed conflict, crime and criminal violence

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Ekaterina Stepanova

EkaterinaStepanovaContinuing proliferation of criminal violence in armed conflict settings and the growing links between crime and conflict underscore the need to more actively integrate the study of organized crime and criminal violence into the analysis of organized collective violence. In 2009 this was illustrated by the case of piracy rooted in the weak, conflict-torn state of Somalia and the interaction between the opium economy and conflict in Afghanistan. Even in the absence of classic armed conflict, systemic criminal violence, such as drug-trafficking-related violence in Mexico, may match conflict in scale and intensity and threaten to undermine human security

2. Armed conflicts and peace processes »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198821557.003.0002

Chapter: 2. Armed conflicts and peace processes

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2018

Author: Dan Smith

OxChapML2.50OUP TCI20180606.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen2. Armed conflicts and peace processesOverviewIn 2017, armed conflicts were active in at least 22 states and many involved multiple non-state armed groups and external actors. Likewise, peace processes are complex and multifaceted, but in 2017 there were few visible examples of successful peacebuilding interventions in the main armed conflicts discussed in this chapter. The resulting human costs fell primarily on civilian populations.In the first 11 months of 2017 the number of civilian deaths caused by explosive weapons was 42 per cent higher than in

5. Arms production »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.003.0006

Chapter: 5. Arms production

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Susan T. Jackson

Susan T.JacksonArms-producing companies displayed resilience, even increasing overall arms sales in 2009, despite the ongoing economic recession. This is true of both companies in North America and Western Europe, which dominate the global arms industry in terms of arms sales, and of companies in some of the smaller economies with advanced arms industries, such as Israel, South Korea and Turkey. Arms sales of the SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies in 2009 reached $401 billion, an increase of $14.8 billion from the previous year. Mega-deal acquisitions returned to the arms industry in 2010.5. Arms productionI.

6. Arms production »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.003.0007

Chapter: 6. Arms production

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Susan T. Jackson

Susan T.JacksonDespite the global financial crisis and economic recession, the arms industry continued to see high levels of arms sales in 2008 and, according to initial assessments, in 2009. Arms sales of the SIPRI Top 100 reached $385 billion in 2008. These increases were in part due to sales of military equipment and services for the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq and to force modernization efforts (e.g. in Russia). While the number of large acquisitions fell in 2009, there was more consolidation in the Israeli, Russian and US industries as well as a continued pattern of arms-producing companies

5. Arms production and military services »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199650583.003.0006

Chapter: 5. Arms production and military services

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2012

Author: Mikael Grinbaum, Susan T. Jackson

MikaelGrinbaumSusan T.Jackson*5. Arms production and military servicesOverviewThe public spending crisis in the Global North has not yet had a large overall impact on the major companies in the arms production and military services industry (‘the arms industry’). Sales of arms and military services by the largest arms-producing companies—the SIPRI Top 100—continued to increase in 2010 to reach $411.1 billion, although at 1 per cent in real terms the rate of increase was slower than in 2009 (seesection IV in this chapter). Between 2002 and 2010 arms sales of companies in

4. Arms production and military services »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199678433.003.0005

Chapter: 4. Arms production and military services

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2013

Author: Susan T. Jackson

Susan T.JacksonAbstract and keywords to be supplied4. Arms production and military servicesOverviewAusterity measures in North America and Western Europe as a result of the 2008 global financial crisis had a varied impact on sales of arms and military services by companies in the SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing and military services companies for 2011. Ongoing spending discussions have generated uncertainty in the largest arms and military services market—the United States—and are a key reason companies based there and in Western Europe are seeking increased market shares in other regions, including Asia, Latin America and the

14. Arms production and military services »

Type: chapter

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780198787280.003.0014

Chapter: 14. Arms production and military services

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2016

Author: Aude Fleurant

AudeFleurantOxChapML2.50OUP TCI20160601.0SIPRIMedicine-UKSIPRI Yearbook SeriesNewgen14. Arms production and military servicesOverviewSales by the SIPRI Top 100 arms and military services industry declined for the fourth consecutive year in 2014. The Top 100 combined revenue for 2014 totalled US $401 billion—1.5 per cent lower than in 2013. However, despite the continuing overall decrease, the turnover of companies ranked in 2014 remained 43 per cent higher than the Top 100 total revenues in 2002. This tends to emphasize the modest level of the decrease observed since the peak in sales reached