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Appendix 5B. Major arms industry acquisitions, 2010 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0007

Chapter: 5. Arms production

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Vincent Boulanin

VincentBoulaninAppendix 5B. Major arms industry acquisitions, 2010I. IntroductionLarge-scale merger and acquisition deals returned to the arms industry in 2010. While there were no deals with a value of over $1 billion (known as ‘mega-deals’) in 2009, there were three in 2010. The trends for arms producers to acquire cybersecurity, intelligence and military services firms continued in 2010. In addition to acquisitions within and between the major industrialized countries that are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), companies based in non-OECD countries such as India and the United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Appendix 5B. The reporting of military expenditure data »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0005

Chapter: 5. Military expenditure

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Noel Kelly

NoelKellyAppendix 5B. The reporting of military expenditure dataI. IntroductionThe public availability of information on military expenditure has increased significantly in recent years. This is due in part to the increasing levels of transparency in many countries that is associated with an increase of democratic governance and civilian control of the military as well as with the development of the Internet: increasing numbers of governments make budgetary information—including military budgets—available online. These national systems of reporting vary considerably in terms of both the level of coverage of the data provided (e.g. what items are included

Appendix 6A. The SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies, 2008 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0006

Chapter: 6. Arms production

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Susan T. Jackson

Susan T.JacksonThe SIPRI Arms Industry Network*Appendix 6A. The SIPRI Top 100 arms-producing companies, 2008I. Selection criteria and sources of dataTable6A.1 lists the world ’ s 100 largest arms-producing companies (excluding Chinese companies), ranked by their arms sales in 2008—the SIPRI Top 100 for 2008. The table contains information on each company’s arms sales in 2007 and 2008 and its total sales, profit and employment in 2008. It includes public and private companies but excludes manufacturing or maintenance units of the armed services. Only companies with operational activities in the field

Appendix 6A. The suppliers and recipients of major conventional weapons, 2006–10 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0008

Chapter: 6. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author:

The SIPRI Arms Transfers ProgrammeAppendix 6A. The suppliers and recipients of major conventional weapons, 2006–10I. IntroductionThe SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme maintains the SIPRI Arms Transfers Database, which contains information on deliveries of major conventional weapons to states, international organizations and non-state armed groups since 1950.1 SIPRI ascribes a trend-indicator value (TIV) to each weapon or subsystem included in the database. SIPRI then calculates the volume of transfers to, from and between all of the above-listed entities using the TIV and the number of weapon systems or subsystems delivered in a given year. TIV

Appendix 6B. Major arms industry acquisitions, 2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0007

Chapter: 6. Arms production

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Susan T. Jackson

Susan T.JacksonAppendix 6B. Major arms industry acquisitions, 2009Table6B.1 lists major acquisitions in the arms industries of member states of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that were announced or completed between 1 January and 31 December 2009. It is not an exhaustive list of all acquisition activity but gives a general overview of strategically significant and financially noteworthy transactions.Table 6B.1. Major acquisitions in the OECD arms industries, 2009Figures are in US $m., at current prices.Buyer company (country)/Subsidiary (country)aAcquired company (country)Seller company (country)bDeal value

Appendix 6B. The financial value of states’ arms exports, 2000–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0009

Chapter: 6. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Mark Bromley

MarkBromleyAppendix 6B. The financial value of states’ arms exports, 2000–2009Table 6B.1 presents official data on the financial value of states’ arms exports in 2000–2009. The countries included in the table are those that provide official data on the financial value of ‘arms exports’, ‘licences for arms exports’ or ‘arms export agreements’ for at least 6 of the 10 years covered and for which the average of the values given exceeds $10 million. In all cases, the ‘stated data coverage’ reflects the language used in the official publication from which the data has been extracted. National

Appendix 6C. Transparency in arms transfers »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0010

Chapter: 6. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Mark Bromley, Paul Holtom

MarkBromleyPaulHoltom*Appendix 6C. Transparency in arms transfersI. IntroductionOfficial and publicly accessible data on arms transfers is important for assessing states’ arms export and arms procurement policies. However, publishing data on arms sales and acquisitions is a sensitive issue for nearly all states. This appendix analyses recent developments in official international, regional and national reporting mechanisms that aim, in whole or in part, to increase the quality and quantity of publicly available information on international arms transfers.Section II describes the trend in reporting to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms

Appendix 7A. Global stocks and production of fissile materials, 2010 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199695522.005.0011

Chapter: 7. World nuclear forces

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2011

Author: Alexander Glaser, Zia Mian

AlexanderGlaserZiaMian*Appendix 7A. Global stocks and production of fissile materials, 2010Materials that can sustain an explosive fission chain reaction are essential for all types of nuclear explosives, from first-generation fission weapons to advanced thermonuclear weapons. The most common of these fissile materials are highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium of almost any isotopic composition. This appendix gives details of current stocks of HEU (table 7A.1) and separated plutonium (table 7A.2), including in weapons, and details of the current capacity to produce these materials (tables 7A.3 and7A.4,

Appendix 7A. The suppliers and recipients of major conventional weapons, 2005–2009 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0008

Chapter: 7. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

The SIPRI Arms Transfers ProgrammeAppendix 7A. The suppliers and recipients of major conventional weapons, 2005–2009I. IntroductionThe SIPRI Arms Transfers Programme maintains the SIPRI Arms Transfers Database, which contains information on deliveries of major conventional weapons to states, international organizations and non-state armed groups since 1950.1 SIPRI ascribes a trend-indicator value (TIV) to each weapon or subsystem included in the database. SIPRI then calculates the volume of transfers to, from and between all of the above-listed entities using the TIV and the number of weapon systems or subsystems delivered in a given year. TIV

Appendix 7B. The financial value of the arms trade, 1999–2008 »

Type: appendix

DOI: 10.1093/sipri/9780199581122.005.0009

Chapter: 7. International arms transfers

Source: SIPRI Yearbook 2010

Author: Mark Bromley

MarkBromleyAppendix 7B. The financial value of the arms trade, 1999–2008Table7B.1 presents official data on the financial value of the arms trade in 1999–2008. The countries included in the table are those that provide official data on the financial value of ‘arms exports’, ‘licences for arms exports’ or ‘arms export agreements’ for at least 6 of the 10 years covered and for which the average of the values given exceeds $10 million. In all cases, the ‘Stated data coverage’ follows the language used in the official publication from which the data has been extracted. National