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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2022

SIPRI Yearbook 2022

II. Global and regional trends and developments in multilateral peace operations

Chapter:
2. Global developments in armed conflict, peace processes and peace operations
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2022
Author(s):
Ian Davis, Claudia Pfeifer Cruz

A key trend in 2021 was the continued decrease in the number of personnel deployed in multilateral peace operations globally. To a large extent this reflects the termination of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-led Resolute Support Mission (RSM) in Afghanistan and the establishment (or continuation) of smaller peace operations that have had relatively stable deployments. The discussions on exit strategies for some of the largest multilateral peace operations, such as the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) and the African Union Mission to Somalia (AMISOM), are also indications of this trend. Moreover, peace operations continue to be concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa, with two out of the three new operations launched in the region. These two peace operations, both in Mozambique, also illustrate the increasing involvement of regional organizations—in this case, the European Union and the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC). In addition, complex constellations of peace operations, concentrated in a handful of host countries, continue to face coordination challenges. The involvement of private military companies in conflict-management efforts in crowded fields, such as the Central African Republic (CAR) and Mali, has also increased the complexity of these environments. Finally, disagreements between organizations, personnel contributors and funders of multilateral peace operations have continued across many operations, and combined with increasing geopolitical rivalries—particularly between Western countries and Russia and China—this often leads to discussions about mission mandates, closures and restructuring.

Citation (MLA):
Davis, Ian, and Claudia Pfeifer Cruz. "2. Global developments in armed conflict, peace processes and peace operations." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 28 Jan. 2023. <https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780192883032/sipri-9780192883032-chapter-002-div1-012.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Davis, I., & Cruz, C. (2016). 2. Global developments in armed conflict, peace processes and peace operations. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2022: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 28 Jan. 2023, from https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780192883032/sipri-9780192883032-chapter-002-div1-012.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Davis, Ian, and Claudia Pfeifer Cruz. "2. Global developments in armed conflict, peace processes and peace operations." In SIPRI Yearbook 2022: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 28 Jan. 2023, from https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780192883032/sipri-9780192883032-chapter-002-div1-012.xml
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