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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2015

SIPRI Yearbook 2015

III. The end of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan

Chapter:
5. Peace operations and conflict management
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2015
Author(s):
Jaïr van der Lijn

The conclusion of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan on 31 December 2014 marked the end of the longest and largest military operation in recent history.1 ISAF was established in 2001 in the wake of a United States-led intervention in Afghanistan and the subsequent removal from power of the Taliban regime, which had ruled the country since 1996. In the 13 years that followed, ISAF evolved from a small multilateral force, with the aim of securing Kabul, to a large operation led by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), conducting security and counterinsurgency operations throughout the country.2 Another major focus was to support the Afghan authorities in developing indigenous military and police forces capable of providing security for its citizens. Altogether, 51 states contributed military personnel to ISAF, which at its height in 2011 comprised more than 130 000 troops operating from 800 bases across Afghanistan.3

Citation (MLA):
van der Lijn, Jaïr. "5. Peace operations and conflict management." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 20 Aug. 2019. <https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-chapter-5-div1-4.xml>.
Citation (APA):
van der Lijn, J. (2016). 5. Peace operations and conflict management. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 20 Aug. 2019, from https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-chapter-5-div1-4.xml
Citation (Chicago):
van der Lijn, Jaïr. "5. Peace operations and conflict management." In SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 20 Aug. 2019, from https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198737810/sipri-9780198737810-chapter-5-div1-4.xml
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