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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2023

SIPRI Yearbook 2023

V. The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation

Chapter:
10. Conventional arms control and regulation of new weapon technologies
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2023
Author(s):
Ian Davis

The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (HCOC) is a multilateral transparency and confidence-building measure covering ballistic missile and space-launch vehicle programmes, policies and activities.1 By subscribing to the HCOC, states commit to curbing the proliferation of ballistic missile systems capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and to exercising ‘maximum possible restraint’ in the development, testing and deployment of ballistic missiles.2 The HCOC was developed from discussions within the framework of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) in 2002, but created as an independent politically binding instrument that is complementary to the MTCR.3 The HCOC is open for subscription by all states and the number of subscribing states has increased from 93 at its inception to 143 today. Since Somalia joined in February 2020, no additional states have subscribed to the HCOC.4 Subscribing states commit to several transparency measures, including providing non-public annual declarations on their national ballistic missile and space-launch vehicle programmes and policies, which is done through a restricted website managed by Austria in its role as the HCOC Immediate Central Contact (Executive Secretariat).5 Via this website, they also exchange pre-launch notifications on launches and test flights of ballistic missiles and space-launch vehicles.6 However, the HCOC does not include a verification mechanism for subscribing states’ declarations and notifications.

Citation (MLA):
Davis, Ian. "10. Conventional arms control and regulation of new weapon technologies." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 20 May. 2024. <https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198890720/sipri-9780198890720-chapter-010-div1-018.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Davis, I. (2016). 10. Conventional arms control and regulation of new weapon technologies. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2023: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 20 May. 2024, from https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198890720/sipri-9780198890720-chapter-010-div1-018.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Davis, Ian. "10. Conventional arms control and regulation of new weapon technologies." In SIPRI Yearbook 2023: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 20 May. 2024, from https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780198890720/sipri-9780198890720-chapter-010-div1-018.xml
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