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Contents

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

SIPRI Yearbook 2011

8. Nuclear arms control and non-proliferation

Chapter:
8. Nuclear arms control and non-proliferation
Source:
SIPRI Yearbook 2011
Author(s):
Shannon N. Kile

Shannon N. Kile

I. Introduction

In the spring of 2010 there was new momentum behind global efforts to promote nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. In April Russia and the United States signed the Treaty on Measures for the Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (New START), mandating further verified reductions in their deployed strategic offensive nuclear forces. Also in April the USA hosted a summit meeting that gathered heads of state and government to support measures to reduce the risk of nuclear terrorism and to increase the security of nuclear materials and facilities worldwide. In addition, in May at the eighth five-yearly Review Conference of the 1968 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, NPT), the states parties reaffirmed the treaty as the principal legal and normative foundation of the global non-proliferation regime. The conference adopted by consensus a final document containing substantive recommendations for advancing the treaty’s principles and objectives.

However, during 2010 little progress was made towards resolving the long-running controversies over the nuclear programmes of Iran and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, or North Korea), which have continued to raise international concerns about the spread of nuclear weapons. These concerns were heightened during the year when North Korea revealed that it had constructed a previously undeclared uranium enrichment plant.

This chapter reviews these and other developments in nuclear arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation in 2010. Section II describes the conclusion of Russian–US negotiations on New START and examines the main limits and provisions of the treaty. Sections III summarizes the US-sponsored Nuclear Security Summit meeting held in Washington, DC, and notes several nuclear security-related developments. Section IV describes the proceedings and results of the 2010 NPT Review Conference and highlights some of the principal points of contention during the meeting. Section V examines the renewal of diplomatic efforts to address international concerns about Iran’s nuclear programme against the background of intensified legal and alleged extra-legal measures to curtail the country’s sensitive nuclear fuel cycle activities. Section VI describes new developments in North Korea’s nuclear weapon programme and the continued diplomatic impasse over the fate of that programme. Section VII presents the conclusions.

Citation (MLA):
Kile, Shannon N.. "8. Nuclear arms control and non-proliferation." SIPRI Yearbook. SIPRI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2016. Web. 21 Apr. 2021. <https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-chapter-9.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Kile, S. (2016). 8. Nuclear arms control and non-proliferation. In SIPRI, SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 21 Apr. 2021, from https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-chapter-9.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Kile, Shannon N.. "8. Nuclear arms control and non-proliferation." In SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, SIPRI. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). Retrieved 21 Apr. 2021, from https://www.sipriyearbook.org/view/9780199695522/sipri-9780199695522-chapter-9.xml